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TITLE
The Red Hills (Lord Macdonald's Forest), Skye
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_2575
PLACENAME
Sconser
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Portree
PERIOD
1920s
CREATOR
J Valentine & Co.
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
34478
KEYWORDS
mountain
deer
Lord Macdonald
sheep
The Red Hills (Lord Macdonald's Forest), Skye

The pointed summit of Glamaig rises in the foreground in this view, with Eyre Point on the Island of Raasay jutting out into the narrows on the left, and in the distance, the mainland. The front caption "Lord Macdonald's Forest" refers to an area that had been used for stalking. In the middle of the 1800s, many landowners were converting their holdings from sheep farming to deer forests. Sheep farming was producing less income due to cheaper imports, immigration and lack of any reinvestment in the land itself by the owners. People with more income to spend on leisure pursuits, and emulating royalty for things Scottish, joined the trek north, for the country life and a trophy of a good set of antlers. In 1884, Lord Macdonald's deer forest holdings are listed at 10,350 statue acres, this photograph showing part of the Sconser deer forest. Over the years, Macdonald's Forest was at times rented to different tenants and a lodge was built at Sconser c1884. The deer forests contributed substantially to the breakdown of the communities, with people being evicted to create more forest area and those who remained having to deal with the destruction of their crops by the deer. These factors contributed to the general unrest of the late 1800s, and were a part of the whole land reform movement

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The Red Hills (Lord Macdonald's Forest), Skye

INVERNESS: Portree

1920s

mountain; deer ; Lord Macdonald; sheep

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

The pointed summit of Glamaig rises in the foreground in this view, with Eyre Point on the Island of Raasay jutting out into the narrows on the left, and in the distance, the mainland. The front caption "Lord Macdonald's Forest" refers to an area that had been used for stalking. In the middle of the 1800s, many landowners were converting their holdings from sheep farming to deer forests. Sheep farming was producing less income due to cheaper imports, immigration and lack of any reinvestment in the land itself by the owners. People with more income to spend on leisure pursuits, and emulating royalty for things Scottish, joined the trek north, for the country life and a trophy of a good set of antlers. In 1884, Lord Macdonald's deer forest holdings are listed at 10,350 statue acres, this photograph showing part of the Sconser deer forest. Over the years, Macdonald's Forest was at times rented to different tenants and a lodge was built at Sconser c1884. The deer forests contributed substantially to the breakdown of the communities, with people being evicted to create more forest area and those who remained having to deal with the destruction of their crops by the deer. These factors contributed to the general unrest of the late 1800s, and were a part of the whole land reform movement