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TITLE
The Inaccessible Pinnacle. Sgurr Dearg, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_2597
PLACENAME
Sgurr Dearg
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Bracadale
PERIOD
1910s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
34498
KEYWORDS
Inaccesible Pinnacle
Cuillin
Sgurr Dearg
An Stac
John Mackenzie
The Inaccessible Pinnacle. Sgurr Dearg, Skye

In his book, The Misty Isle of Skye published in 1905, JA MacCulloch wrote, 'Inaccessible as it looks, this pinnacle may be surmounted by experienced climbers who love to do what no one else has done and to boast thereof for ever after.' Indeed, it would be well founded boasting, for the In Pin, as it is often called, is not conquered without skill and nerve. Different guide books refer to the In Pin as a preposterous blade of rock, or a bizarre appendage. Whatever it is called, it certainly stands out. Rising 24m (80ft) above the south-east slope of Sgurr Dearg, and overtopping the Sgurr Dearg summit by about 8m (24ft), there is argument about whether the summit of Sgurr Dearg constitutes a Munro, or in order to tick this Munro off the list, one must climb the pinnacle. Purists have no doubts, but many a Munro bagger (climbers who ascend all the hills over 3000ft) is thwarted by this monolith. It was first climbed by Charles and Lawrence Pilkington in 1880 with Skyeman John MacKenzie as their guide. To see the Inaccessible Pinnacle in unrivalled, dramatic setting, climbers often clamber up the nearby 953m (3126ft) An Stac

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The Inaccessible Pinnacle. Sgurr Dearg, Skye

INVERNESS: Bracadale

1910s

Inaccesible Pinnacle; Cuillin; Sgurr Dearg; An Stac; John Mackenzie

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

In his book, The Misty Isle of Skye published in 1905, JA MacCulloch wrote, 'Inaccessible as it looks, this pinnacle may be surmounted by experienced climbers who love to do what no one else has done and to boast thereof for ever after.' Indeed, it would be well founded boasting, for the In Pin, as it is often called, is not conquered without skill and nerve. Different guide books refer to the In Pin as a preposterous blade of rock, or a bizarre appendage. Whatever it is called, it certainly stands out. Rising 24m (80ft) above the south-east slope of Sgurr Dearg, and overtopping the Sgurr Dearg summit by about 8m (24ft), there is argument about whether the summit of Sgurr Dearg constitutes a Munro, or in order to tick this Munro off the list, one must climb the pinnacle. Purists have no doubts, but many a Munro bagger (climbers who ascend all the hills over 3000ft) is thwarted by this monolith. It was first climbed by Charles and Lawrence Pilkington in 1880 with Skyeman John MacKenzie as their guide. To see the Inaccessible Pinnacle in unrivalled, dramatic setting, climbers often clamber up the nearby 953m (3126ft) An Stac