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TITLE
Rhudh' an Dunain and Canna, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_2638
PLACENAME
Rubh' an Dunain
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Bracadale
PERIOD
1920s
CREATOR
J Valentine & Co.
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
34541
KEYWORDS
Rubh' an Dunain
MacAskill
cairn
cave
Rhudh' an Dunain and Canna, Skye

The peninsula of Rubh' an Dunain jutting out into the Cuillin Sound provides wonderful uninterrupted views to the islands of Rum, Canna, Soay and Eigg, and offers a natural defensive position, with little chance of a boat getting past unnoticed. The last inhabitant of Rubh' an Dunain was Hugh MacAskill who died in 1864. This had been MacAskill country for centuries and being lieutenants of the MacLeods, they were rewarded with land and status for their services to the MacLeods. However there is evidence of much earlier settlement, with a Neolithic chambered cairn, stone age cave, old hut circles and a man-made canal connecting a small loch to the only sheltered inlet on the peninsula. The site was excavated in 1932 by W Lindsay Scott

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Rhudh' an Dunain and Canna, Skye

INVERNESS: Bracadale

1920s

Rubh' an Dunain; MacAskill; cairn; cave

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

The peninsula of Rubh' an Dunain jutting out into the Cuillin Sound provides wonderful uninterrupted views to the islands of Rum, Canna, Soay and Eigg, and offers a natural defensive position, with little chance of a boat getting past unnoticed. The last inhabitant of Rubh' an Dunain was Hugh MacAskill who died in 1864. This had been MacAskill country for centuries and being lieutenants of the MacLeods, they were rewarded with land and status for their services to the MacLeods. However there is evidence of much earlier settlement, with a Neolithic chambered cairn, stone age cave, old hut circles and a man-made canal connecting a small loch to the only sheltered inlet on the peninsula. The site was excavated in 1932 by W Lindsay Scott