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TITLE
Dulsie Bridge on the Findhorn, near Nairn
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_2676
PLACENAME
Dulsie Bridge
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
NAIRN: Ardclach
PERIOD
1880s
CREATOR
J Valentine & Co.
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
34582
KEYWORDS
postcards
bridges
rivers
gorge
rocks
roads
Wade's military roads
Jacobites
risings
George Wade
Caulfield
Dulsie Bridge on the Findhorn, near Nairn

This postcard shows Dulsie Bridge, built of Ardclach granite in the 1750s, at a cost of £150. It spans the River Findhorn's rocky gorges. The rock on one side of the river is higher than the rock on the other, giving the bridge a slanting appearance.

Dulsie Bridge is often referred to as a General Wade bridge, but it was in fact built by his successor Major William Caulfield as part of the military road constructed to link Perth and Fort George. This road was built between 1748 and 1757, after the defeat of the 1745 Jacobite rising. Wade died in 1748.

Robert Burns stayed at the nearby King's Inn in 1787 and wrote: 'Come through mist and darkness to Dulsie to lie, Findhorn River, rocky banks'.

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Dulsie Bridge on the Findhorn, near Nairn

NAIRN: Ardclach

1880s

postcards; bridges; rivers; gorge; rocks; roads; Wade's military roads; Jacobites; risings; George Wade; Caulfield

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Dulsie Bridge, built of Ardclach granite in the 1750s, at a cost of £150. It spans the River Findhorn's rocky gorges. The rock on one side of the river is higher than the rock on the other, giving the bridge a slanting appearance. <br /> <br /> Dulsie Bridge is often referred to as a General Wade bridge, but it was in fact built by his successor Major William Caulfield as part of the military road constructed to link Perth and Fort George. This road was built between 1748 and 1757, after the defeat of the 1745 Jacobite rising. Wade died in 1748.<br /> <br /> Robert Burns stayed at the nearby King's Inn in 1787 and wrote: 'Come through mist and darkness to Dulsie to lie, Findhorn River, rocky banks'.