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TITLE
Cawdor Castle and gardens, Nairn
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_2684
PLACENAME
Cawdor
DISTRICT
Nairn (landward)
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
NAIRN: Cawdor
PERIOD
1960s; 1970s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
34589
KEYWORDS
postcards
castles
park
parks
mazes
Shakespeare
tower houses
Campbells
clans
Jacobites
ancestral home
ancestral homes
mansions
mansion houses
tourism
visitor attractions
Cawdor Castle and gardens, Nairn

This postcard shows Cawdor Castle from one of its gardens. The castle has extensive wooded parkland and three gardens. The Walled Garden was created in the early 17th century for the cultivation of flowers, fruit and vegetables. It later became a kitchen garden and now includes a holly maze. The Flower Garden, pictured here, was laid out about 100 years later and is famed for its herbaceous borders. The Wild Garden was planted in the 1960s and lies between the Castle and Cawdor Burn.

According to Shakespeare's 'Macbeth', Cawdor Castle was the scene of King Duncan's death, but Macbeth died in 1052, several centuries before the present castle was built. In 1454 Thane William of Calder received a royal licence to build a castle at Cawdor. He built a simple four-storey tower house, which was later restyled with roof turrets.

The original family name was Calder but in 1510 Muriel Calder was forced to marry Sir John Campbell and the lands and title passed to the Campbell clan. In the late 17th century Sir Hugh Campbell of Cawdor made some major alterations and additions to the castle, not long before he and his family had to leave Cawdor because of their Jacobite sympathies. When they returned they began work on the restoration and conservation of the castle. Cawdor Castle is still home to the Cawdor family as well as being a significant visitor attraction.

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Cawdor Castle and gardens, Nairn

NAIRN: Cawdor

1960s; 1970s

postcards; castles; park; parks; mazes; Shakespeare; tower houses; Campbells; clans; Jacobites; ancestral home; ancestral homes; mansions; mansion houses; tourism; visitor attractions

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Cawdor Castle from one of its gardens. The castle has extensive wooded parkland and three gardens. The Walled Garden was created in the early 17th century for the cultivation of flowers, fruit and vegetables. It later became a kitchen garden and now includes a holly maze. The Flower Garden, pictured here, was laid out about 100 years later and is famed for its herbaceous borders. The Wild Garden was planted in the 1960s and lies between the Castle and Cawdor Burn.<br /> <br /> According to Shakespeare's 'Macbeth', Cawdor Castle was the scene of King Duncan's death, but Macbeth died in 1052, several centuries before the present castle was built. In 1454 Thane William of Calder received a royal licence to build a castle at Cawdor. He built a simple four-storey tower house, which was later restyled with roof turrets. <br /> <br /> The original family name was Calder but in 1510 Muriel Calder was forced to marry Sir John Campbell and the lands and title passed to the Campbell clan. In the late 17th century Sir Hugh Campbell of Cawdor made some major alterations and additions to the castle, not long before he and his family had to leave Cawdor because of their Jacobite sympathies. When they returned they began work on the restoration and conservation of the castle. Cawdor Castle is still home to the Cawdor family as well as being a significant visitor attraction.