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TITLE
Playing with a gird and cleek
EXTERNAL ID
AB_HFM_SCHOOL_016
PLACENAME
Newtonmore
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh
CREATOR
Clare Maclean
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
346
KEYWORDS
girds and cleeks
traditional games
traditional toys
Playing with a gird and cleek

A child running with a gird and cleek outside the Knockbain School at the Highland Folk Museum in Newtonmore. The gird and cleek was a toy which was widely used in the late 19th and early 20th century. In this photograph the cleek is attatched to the gird but some were made as separate entities, the cleek having a hook at one end which would have been skillfully attached once the gird was in motion.

The school was originally erected about 1925 at Knockbain by Kirkhill, 13 kilometres from Inverness and was moved to the museum in 1998, opening in spring 2000. It is a pre-fabricated, timber framed, iron-clad building of a kind that was common in Scotland from the mid-1800s and measures 12 metres by 6 metres. It encloses 4 timber board rooms, namely a large classroom with a range to provide heat, a cloakroom with 3 washbasins, a small teacher's room and an adjoining teacher's toilet. The picture shows the large windows incorporated into the building to give a light, airy interior.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Playing with a gird and cleek

INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh

girds and cleeks; traditional games; traditional toys;

Am Baile

Highland Folk Museum Schoolhouse

A child running with a gird and cleek outside the Knockbain School at the Highland Folk Museum in Newtonmore. The gird and cleek was a toy which was widely used in the late 19th and early 20th century. In this photograph the cleek is attatched to the gird but some were made as separate entities, the cleek having a hook at one end which would have been skillfully attached once the gird was in motion.<br /> <br /> The school was originally erected about 1925 at Knockbain by Kirkhill, 13 kilometres from Inverness and was moved to the museum in 1998, opening in spring 2000. It is a pre-fabricated, timber framed, iron-clad building of a kind that was common in Scotland from the mid-1800s and measures 12 metres by 6 metres. It encloses 4 timber board rooms, namely a large classroom with a range to provide heat, a cloakroom with 3 washbasins, a small teacher's room and an adjoining teacher's toilet. The picture shows the large windows incorporated into the building to give a light, airy interior.