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TITLE
Learning how to use a gird and cleek
EXTERNAL ID
AB_HFM_SCHOOL_017
PLACENAME
Newtonmore
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh
CREATOR
Clare Maclean
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
347
KEYWORDS
traditional games
traditional toys
Learning how to use a gird and cleek

A schoolgirl being instructed in the art of using a gird and cleek by the teacher at Knockbain School at the Highland Folk Museum in Newtonmore. This is a traditional game from the late 19th and early 20th centuries and involves pushing a metal hoop along with a metal stick. This picture shows a gird with a cleek attached and the child is learning how to control the hoop in order to be able to run with it. In the days of little traffic, boys and girls would have had races along the deserted roads in the towns and cities but the gird and cleek can be used just as well on the short grass of the hills and glens.

The school was originally erected about 1925 at Knockbain by Kirkhill, 13 kilometres from Inverness and was moved to the museum in 1998, opening in spring 2000. It is a pre-fabricated, timber framed, iron-clad building of a kind that was common in Scotland from the mid-1800s and measures 12 metres by 6 metres. It encloses 4 timber board rooms, namely a large classroom with a range to provide heat, a cloakroom with 3 washbasins, a small teacher's room and an adjoining teacher's toilet. The picture shows the large windows incorporated into the building to give a light, airy interior.

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Learning how to use a gird and cleek

INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh

traditional games; traditional toys;

Am Baile

Highland Folk Museum Schoolhouse

A schoolgirl being instructed in the art of using a gird and cleek by the teacher at Knockbain School at the Highland Folk Museum in Newtonmore. This is a traditional game from the late 19th and early 20th centuries and involves pushing a metal hoop along with a metal stick. This picture shows a gird with a cleek attached and the child is learning how to control the hoop in order to be able to run with it. In the days of little traffic, boys and girls would have had races along the deserted roads in the towns and cities but the gird and cleek can be used just as well on the short grass of the hills and glens.<br /> <br /> The school was originally erected about 1925 at Knockbain by Kirkhill, 13 kilometres from Inverness and was moved to the museum in 1998, opening in spring 2000. It is a pre-fabricated, timber framed, iron-clad building of a kind that was common in Scotland from the mid-1800s and measures 12 metres by 6 metres. It encloses 4 timber board rooms, namely a large classroom with a range to provide heat, a cloakroom with 3 washbasins, a small teacher's room and an adjoining teacher's toilet. The picture shows the large windows incorporated into the building to give a light, airy interior.