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TITLE
Sol-fa music chart
EXTERNAL ID
AB_HFM_SCHOOL_022
PLACENAME
Newtonmore
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh
CREATOR
Clare Maclean
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
350
KEYWORDS
music
lessons
school
teaching
singing
Sol-fa music chart

Curwen's Modulator was a common sight in schools across the country. Reverend John Curwen drew upon a number of similar methods from England and the rest of Europe to come up with his Tonic Sol-fa method of teaching vocal music. The main notes of the sol-fa scale (doh, ray, me, fah, sol, lah, te, doh) are well known thanks to the musical 'The Sound of Music'.

Knockbain School was a timber and corrugated iron kit school originally built in Kirkhill parish near Inverness. Kit schools such as this had a classroom, a cloakroom, a teacher's store and a toilet. Knockbain School was re-erected at the Highland Folk Museum in Newtonmore in 1999 and has been set up to resemble a school in 1937.

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Sol-fa music chart

INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh

music; lessons; school; teaching; singing

Am Baile

Highland Folk Museum Schoolhouse

Curwen's Modulator was a common sight in schools across the country. Reverend John Curwen drew upon a number of similar methods from England and the rest of Europe to come up with his Tonic Sol-fa method of teaching vocal music. The main notes of the sol-fa scale (doh, ray, me, fah, sol, lah, te, doh) are well known thanks to the musical 'The Sound of Music'.<br /> <br /> Knockbain School was a timber and corrugated iron kit school originally built in Kirkhill parish near Inverness. Kit schools such as this had a classroom, a cloakroom, a teacher's store and a toilet. Knockbain School was re-erected at the Highland Folk Museum in Newtonmore in 1999 and has been set up to resemble a school in 1937.