Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
With the Holiday Fellowship, Alltshellach Garden
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_3490
PLACENAME
Ballachulish
DISTRICT
North Lorn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Lismore and Appin
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
35336
KEYWORDS
postcard
photograph
Ballachulish
quarrey
Glenachulish
Glencoe
Loch Leven
mountains
slate
ferry
Altshelllach
With the Holiday Fellowship, Alltshellach Garden

This postcard contains a view of the path leading up to the Ballachulish Ferry. Located east of Glencoe, at the meeting of Loch Leven and Loch Linnhe, the name Ballachulish originates from the Gaelic meaning, 'village on the narrows.'

The settlement initially grew around the nearby slate quarries in the eighteenth century, mined to supply tiles for roofing Victorian Glasgow.

The ferry, which first saw regular operation in the early eighteenth century, crosses Loch Leven from the north bank at the Narrows. In 1903, a branch of the Callander and Oban Railway opened at Ballachulish, making the region more accessible. The ferry continued operation until December 1975, when it was finally superseded by the construction of Ballachulish Bridge.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

With the Holiday Fellowship, Alltshellach Garden

ARGYLL: Lismore and Appin

postcard; photograph; Ballachulish; quarrey; Glenachulish; Glencoe; Loch Leven; mountains; slate; ferry; Altshelllach

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard contains a view of the path leading up to the Ballachulish Ferry. Located east of Glencoe, at the meeting of Loch Leven and Loch Linnhe, the name Ballachulish originates from the Gaelic meaning, 'village on the narrows.' <br /> <br /> The settlement initially grew around the nearby slate quarries in the eighteenth century, mined to supply tiles for roofing Victorian Glasgow. <br /> <br /> The ferry, which first saw regular operation in the early eighteenth century, crosses Loch Leven from the north bank at the Narrows. In 1903, a branch of the Callander and Oban Railway opened at Ballachulish, making the region more accessible. The ferry continued operation until December 1975, when it was finally superseded by the construction of Ballachulish Bridge.