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TITLE
Castle of Mey, Dunnet
EXTERNAL ID
CAITHHORZ_T43
PLACENAME
Mey
DISTRICT
Caithness - Northern
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Canisbay
SOURCE
Caithness Horizons
ASSET ID
3540
KEYWORDS
castles
royalty
royal family
Castle of Mey, Dunnet

This picture shows the Castle of Mey, near Dunnet, Caithness.

The Castle of Mey was built by George, the 4th Earl of Caithness, for his second son William Sinclair. When visiting the family seat Castle Sinclair Girnigoe in 1573, William was murdered by his older brother John, who had been imprisoned there for about six years by his father. John had been planning an escape but William found out about it and told their father.

John was in turn murdered and the castle went to the third son, George Sinclair, who founded the family of the Sinclairs of Mey and succeeded to the Earldom in 1789. He changed the name of the castle to Barrogill Castle.

The castle then became the seat of the Earls of Caithness for the next one hundred years.

In 1819 the twelfth Earl commissioned the architect, William Burn, to make various ambitious alterations to the castle. This was when the grand entrance and the dining room were added. His son, Alexander, was responsible for erecting the monument, now known as 'Lady Fanny's seat as a tribute to his friend, Charles John Canning, who later became the first Viceroy of India.

George, the fifteenth Earl died at the age of 30; he had never married and having no children, left the castle to his friend F G Heathcote, on condition that he changed his name to Sinclair. His widow eventually sold it to Captain F B Imbert-Terry, who subsequently sold it to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother in 1952.

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother first saw what was then Barrogill Castle in 1952, while mourning the death of her husband, King George VI. Falling for its isolated charm and hearing it was to be abandoned, she decided to save it.

Having acquired the most northerly inhabited castle on the British mainland, The Queen Mother renovated and restored it and created the beautiful gardens. For almost half a century she spent many summers here and shorter visits at other times of the year.


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For further information about purchasing and prices please email
Caithness Horizons

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Castle of Mey, Dunnet

CAITHNESS: Canisbay

castles; royalty; royal family

Caithness Horizons

Caithness Horizons

This picture shows the Castle of Mey, near Dunnet, Caithness.<br /> <br /> The Castle of Mey was built by George, the 4th Earl of Caithness, for his second son William Sinclair. When visiting the family seat Castle Sinclair Girnigoe in 1573, William was murdered by his older brother John, who had been imprisoned there for about six years by his father. John had been planning an escape but William found out about it and told their father. <br /> <br /> John was in turn murdered and the castle went to the third son, George Sinclair, who founded the family of the Sinclairs of Mey and succeeded to the Earldom in 1789. He changed the name of the castle to Barrogill Castle. <br /> <br /> The castle then became the seat of the Earls of Caithness for the next one hundred years. <br /> <br /> In 1819 the twelfth Earl commissioned the architect, William Burn, to make various ambitious alterations to the castle. This was when the grand entrance and the dining room were added. His son, Alexander, was responsible for erecting the monument, now known as 'Lady Fanny's seat as a tribute to his friend, Charles John Canning, who later became the first Viceroy of India. <br /> <br /> George, the fifteenth Earl died at the age of 30; he had never married and having no children, left the castle to his friend F G Heathcote, on condition that he changed his name to Sinclair. His widow eventually sold it to Captain F B Imbert-Terry, who subsequently sold it to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother in 1952. <br /> <br /> Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother first saw what was then Barrogill Castle in 1952, while mourning the death of her husband, King George VI. Falling for its isolated charm and hearing it was to be abandoned, she decided to save it. <br /> <br /> Having acquired the most northerly inhabited castle on the British mainland, The Queen Mother renovated and restored it and created the beautiful gardens. For almost half a century she spent many summers here and shorter visits at other times of the year. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: joannehowdle@caithnesshorizons.co.uk">Caithness Horizons</a><br />