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TITLE
Last House and Hotel, John o' Groats
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_3799
PLACENAME
John o' Groats
DISTRICT
Caithness - Northern
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Canisbay
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
35632
KEYWORDS
hotels
Last House and Hotel, John o' Groats

This postcard shows a view of the John O'Groats House Hotel in Caithness and the Last House in Scotland.

The hotel was established in 1875, with several extensions added at later dates. It is situated on the site of an earlier house, reputedly octagonal in shape, and built by Jan De Groot. The village takes its name from the Dutchman.

De Groot was given the first licence to operate a ferry over to Orkney, in 1486. Local folklore suggests that the Dutchman built the octagonal house with an eight-sided table inside, so he could eat with his eight sons. This prevented arguments over who was closest to the head of the table and meant that all sons could find favour with their father. A flagpole by the side of the hotel marks the spot where the house is thought to have existed. The building's octagonal shape is reflected in the architecture of the John O' Groat's Hotel.

The 19th century building in the foreground is controversially known as the last house on the Scottish mainland, although many believe that the last dwelling is at Dunnet Head. The house is now John O' Groat's museum and thousands of visitors flock here every year

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Last House and Hotel, John o' Groats

CAITHNESS: Canisbay

hotels

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a view of the John O'Groats House Hotel in Caithness and the Last House in Scotland.<br /> <br /> The hotel was established in 1875, with several extensions added at later dates. It is situated on the site of an earlier house, reputedly octagonal in shape, and built by Jan De Groot. The village takes its name from the Dutchman.<br /> <br /> De Groot was given the first licence to operate a ferry over to Orkney, in 1486. Local folklore suggests that the Dutchman built the octagonal house with an eight-sided table inside, so he could eat with his eight sons. This prevented arguments over who was closest to the head of the table and meant that all sons could find favour with their father. A flagpole by the side of the hotel marks the spot where the house is thought to have existed. The building's octagonal shape is reflected in the architecture of the John O' Groat's Hotel.<br /> <br /> The 19th century building in the foreground is controversially known as the last house on the Scottish mainland, although many believe that the last dwelling is at Dunnet Head. The house is now John O' Groat's museum and thousands of visitors flock here every year