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TITLE
Lochgelly Tawse
EXTERNAL ID
AB_HFM_SCHOOL_046
PLACENAME
Newtonmore
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh
CREATOR
Clare Maclean
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
360
KEYWORDS
punishments
schools
strap
belt
tawse
Lochgelly Tawse

A Lochgelly Tawse was once a common sight in schools across Scotland. A tawse was a thick leather strap cut into two or three tails at one end. The first Lochgelly tawse was made by a saddler named Philips, in the town of Lochgelly, for his brother and sister who were both teachers. The business passed on to the Dick family, also of Lochgelly, and their tawses were known for their quality. John Dick and Sons of Lochgelly manufactured their tawses for use in schools as corporal punishment. Official regulations for the use of the tawse, or belt, in schools state that the punishment should be inflicted in front of the other pupils. The pupil receiving the punishment was to hold out his or her hand, palm up, supported by the other hand. If more than one stroke was to be administered the hands should be swapped round after each stroke. The strap would be given as a punishment for a number of reasons ranging from disobedience and insolence to bad spelling and poor handwriting.

Knockbain School was a timber and corrugated iron kit school originally built in Kirkhill parish near Inverness. Kit schools such as this had a classroom, a cloakroom, a teacher's store and a toilet. Knockbain School was re-erected at the Highland Folk Museum in Newtonmore in 1999 and has been set up to resemble a school in 1937.

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Lochgelly Tawse

INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh

punishments; schools; strap; belt; tawse

Am Baile

Highland Folk Museum Schoolhouse

A Lochgelly Tawse was once a common sight in schools across Scotland. A tawse was a thick leather strap cut into two or three tails at one end. The first Lochgelly tawse was made by a saddler named Philips, in the town of Lochgelly, for his brother and sister who were both teachers. The business passed on to the Dick family, also of Lochgelly, and their tawses were known for their quality. John Dick and Sons of Lochgelly manufactured their tawses for use in schools as corporal punishment. Official regulations for the use of the tawse, or belt, in schools state that the punishment should be inflicted in front of the other pupils. The pupil receiving the punishment was to hold out his or her hand, palm up, supported by the other hand. If more than one stroke was to be administered the hands should be swapped round after each stroke. The strap would be given as a punishment for a number of reasons ranging from disobedience and insolence to bad spelling and poor handwriting.<br /> <br /> Knockbain School was a timber and corrugated iron kit school originally built in Kirkhill parish near Inverness. Kit schools such as this had a classroom, a cloakroom, a teacher's store and a toilet. Knockbain School was re-erected at the Highland Folk Museum in Newtonmore in 1999 and has been set up to resemble a school in 1937.