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TITLE
Ink pen with blotting paper
EXTERNAL ID
AB_HFM_SCHOOL_047
PLACENAME
Newtonmore
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh
CREATOR
Clare Maclean
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
361
KEYWORDS
pens
nib pens
ink
ink wells
schools
desks
lessons
handwriting
writing
Ink pen with blotting paper

Up until the early to mid-1900s paper was considered too expensive for widespread use in many small schools. Pupils would instead use a slate and slate pencil for most lessons. Handwriting, however, was practised in a copybook using a nib pen and ink. The ink would be kept in a jug by the teacher and poured into the desk's inkwells for the handwriting lesson. A piece of blotting paper would be used to stop the ink smudging on the page. Many pupils who used nib pens and inkwells tell stories of dipping balls of rolled up blotting paper into the inkwells to create little ink bullets to throw around the classroom. No doubt being caught would result in the use of the Lochgelly Tawse as a punishment.

Knockbain School was a timber and corrugated iron kit school originally built in Kirkhill parish near Inverness. Kit schools such as this had a classroom, a cloakroom, a teacher's store and a toilet. Knockbain School was re-erected at the Highland Folk Museum in Newtonmore in 1999 and has been set up to resemble a school in 1937.

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Ink pen with blotting paper

INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh

pens; nib pens; ink; ink wells; schools; desks; lessons; handwriting; writing

Am Baile

Highland Folk Museum Schoolhouse

Up until the early to mid-1900s paper was considered too expensive for widespread use in many small schools. Pupils would instead use a slate and slate pencil for most lessons. Handwriting, however, was practised in a copybook using a nib pen and ink. The ink would be kept in a jug by the teacher and poured into the desk's inkwells for the handwriting lesson. A piece of blotting paper would be used to stop the ink smudging on the page. Many pupils who used nib pens and inkwells tell stories of dipping balls of rolled up blotting paper into the inkwells to create little ink bullets to throw around the classroom. No doubt being caught would result in the use of the Lochgelly Tawse as a punishment.<br /> <br /> Knockbain School was a timber and corrugated iron kit school originally built in Kirkhill parish near Inverness. Kit schools such as this had a classroom, a cloakroom, a teacher's store and a toilet. Knockbain School was re-erected at the Highland Folk Museum in Newtonmore in 1999 and has been set up to resemble a school in 1937.