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TITLE
Loch Ness Monster at Castle Urquhart
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_4383
PLACENAME
Loch Ness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
36179
KEYWORDS
Nessie
sea monsters
legends
castles
humour
Loch Ness Monster at Castle Urquhart

Postcard of Urquhart Castle and Loch Ness

Urquhart Castle is a ruined stronghold positioned on a promontory on Loch Ness, 2.7 km southeast of Drumnadrochit. Archaeological evidence has shown that the site has been occupied and fortified since the Iron Age. In 1229 the Sheriff of Inverness, Thomas Durward, was granted the lordship of Urquhart by Alexander II. It is likely that Thomas or his son Alan built a motte-and-bailey type castle on the site.

The first War of Independence saw control of the castle change hands a number of times. In the later part of the 14th century, the castle underwent major reconstruction. In 1482 John Grant of Freuchie was granted a lease of the lands of Urquhart, and the castle was again reconstructed. In the 15th and 16th centuries the castle and surrounding areas were raided several times by the MacDonald Lords of the Isles, the castle being illegally occupied between 1513 and 1516 by Sir Donald MacDonald of Lochalsh.

In 1644 the castle was plundered by the Covenanting army, and repaired in 1676. In 1689, when James VII was deposed from the throne and replaced by William of Orange, a garrison loyal to William blew up Urquhart Castle's gatehouse in order to prevent it becoming a Jacobite stronghold. Although Parliament agreed to pay the Laird of Grant compensation for the damage, it does not appear that repairs were ever made after this attack. Evidence shows that in 1708 local people were plundering the castle, and in 1715 a wall collapsed on the castle's north tower.

The castle was used as a quarry until it became Government property in 1912. Urquhart Castle is now controlled by Historic Scotland.

Loch Ness is the largest body of fresh water in Great Britain at 39 km long and 132 m deep. The loch is fed by 40 rivers and streams and flows to the sea through the Caledonian Canal and the River Ness. It is on an active side-slip fault

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Loch Ness Monster at Castle Urquhart

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

Nessie; sea monsters; legends; castles; humour

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries - Illustrated postcards

Postcard of Urquhart Castle and Loch Ness<br /> <br /> Urquhart Castle is a ruined stronghold positioned on a promontory on Loch Ness, 2.7 km southeast of Drumnadrochit. Archaeological evidence has shown that the site has been occupied and fortified since the Iron Age. In 1229 the Sheriff of Inverness, Thomas Durward, was granted the lordship of Urquhart by Alexander II. It is likely that Thomas or his son Alan built a motte-and-bailey type castle on the site. <br /> <br /> The first War of Independence saw control of the castle change hands a number of times. In the later part of the 14th century, the castle underwent major reconstruction. In 1482 John Grant of Freuchie was granted a lease of the lands of Urquhart, and the castle was again reconstructed. In the 15th and 16th centuries the castle and surrounding areas were raided several times by the MacDonald Lords of the Isles, the castle being illegally occupied between 1513 and 1516 by Sir Donald MacDonald of Lochalsh. <br /> <br /> In 1644 the castle was plundered by the Covenanting army, and repaired in 1676. In 1689, when James VII was deposed from the throne and replaced by William of Orange, a garrison loyal to William blew up Urquhart Castle's gatehouse in order to prevent it becoming a Jacobite stronghold. Although Parliament agreed to pay the Laird of Grant compensation for the damage, it does not appear that repairs were ever made after this attack. Evidence shows that in 1708 local people were plundering the castle, and in 1715 a wall collapsed on the castle's north tower.<br /> <br /> The castle was used as a quarry until it became Government property in 1912. Urquhart Castle is now controlled by Historic Scotland.<br /> <br /> Loch Ness is the largest body of fresh water in Great Britain at 39 km long and 132 m deep. The loch is fed by 40 rivers and streams and flows to the sea through the Caledonian Canal and the River Ness. It is on an active side-slip fault