Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Ceanacroe Lodge, (Ceannacroc Lodge), Glenmoriston
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_5594
PLACENAME
Ceannacroc Estate
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
PERIOD
1920s; 1930s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
37219
KEYWORDS
postcards
Ceannacroc
Kenacrock
Clan Grant
Gordons
Camerons
battles
executons
Roderick Mackenzie
Jacobites
Prince Charles Edward Stuart
Meux
Orr-Ewing
fires
hydro-electricity
Ceanacroe Lodge, (Ceannacroc Lodge), Glenmoriston

This postcard shows Ceanacroe Lodge (Ceannacroc Lodge) in Glenmoriston.

The estate of Ceannacroc (Ceanacroe, Kenacrock, Kaun-a-Krock, Ceanna Chroc) was once part of the lands of Clan Grant. The name, which means 'The Knoll of the Heads', is said to have come from a battle between the Gordons under the Marquis of Huntly and the Camerons under Locheil. The Gordons were defeated and Huntly taken captive. Mac-Ian-Chaoil, chief of a sept of Clan MacDonald, who lived in Glenmoriston, came to the rescue. The Camerons retreated with seven Gordon prisoners. Finding that the prisoners were hindering their escape they beheaded them on the Knoll of the Heads.

At Ceannacroc a cairn marks the spot where Roderick Mackenzie, the son of an Edinburgh jeweller and an officer in Prince Charles Edward Stuart's bodyguard, was killed after the battle of Culloden. Mackenzie bore a remarkable resemblance to the Prince and when he was shot by Government troops with his dying breath he called out 'You have killed your prince'. The troops, thinking they would claim the reward for killing the Prince, took Mackenzie's head to Fort Augustus. No-one could properly identify the head but the search was scaled down and the Prince was able to make his escape.

In the 1850s the estate of Ceannacroc was in the hands of Sir Henry Meux second baronet and heir to the family's Horseshoe Brewery in London

The second baronet did not have the drive and ability of his father who had built up the brewery to have the fifth largest output in London. The brewery was run by Richard Berridge and Dudley Coutts Marjoribanks, Lord Tweedmouth, who bought the adjoining Guisachan Estate. The brewery generated a considerable fortune which financed the second baronet's lavish lifestyle. Sir Henry was elected MP for Hertfordshire in 1849. His mental health (it is likely he suffered from syphilis) deteriorated yet despite hardly being able to string a few words together he was re-elected in 1857. In 1858 he was the subject of a lunacy hearing at which he was declared insane but he held the seat until 1859. He survived for another twenty-five years.

The estate was bought by Lady Cooper towards the end of the nineteenth century and then by Mr Orr-Ewing at the beginning of the twentieth century. He built the lodge seen here but it burned down in 1949 as the result of a chimney fire in the pantry.

There is now a more modest lodge which houses an art gallery.

A tunnel carrying water for the Garry-Moriston Hydro-Electric Scheme runs through the hills of the Ceannocroc Estate to Ceannacroc Power station, the first power station to be built underground.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Ceanacroe Lodge, (Ceannacroc Lodge), Glenmoriston

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1920s; 1930s

postcards; Ceannacroc; Kenacrock; Clan Grant; Gordons; Camerons; battles; executons; Roderick Mackenzie; Jacobites; Prince Charles Edward Stuart; Meux; Orr-Ewing; fires; hydro-electricity

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Ceanacroe Lodge (Ceannacroc Lodge) in Glenmoriston. <br /> <br /> The estate of Ceannacroc (Ceanacroe, Kenacrock, Kaun-a-Krock, Ceanna Chroc) was once part of the lands of Clan Grant. The name, which means 'The Knoll of the Heads', is said to have come from a battle between the Gordons under the Marquis of Huntly and the Camerons under Locheil. The Gordons were defeated and Huntly taken captive. Mac-Ian-Chaoil, chief of a sept of Clan MacDonald, who lived in Glenmoriston, came to the rescue. The Camerons retreated with seven Gordon prisoners. Finding that the prisoners were hindering their escape they beheaded them on the Knoll of the Heads.<br /> <br /> At Ceannacroc a cairn marks the spot where Roderick Mackenzie, the son of an Edinburgh jeweller and an officer in Prince Charles Edward Stuart's bodyguard, was killed after the battle of Culloden. Mackenzie bore a remarkable resemblance to the Prince and when he was shot by Government troops with his dying breath he called out 'You have killed your prince'. The troops, thinking they would claim the reward for killing the Prince, took Mackenzie's head to Fort Augustus. No-one could properly identify the head but the search was scaled down and the Prince was able to make his escape. <br /> <br /> In the 1850s the estate of Ceannacroc was in the hands of Sir Henry Meux second baronet and heir to the family's Horseshoe Brewery in London <br /> <br /> The second baronet did not have the drive and ability of his father who had built up the brewery to have the fifth largest output in London. The brewery was run by Richard Berridge and Dudley Coutts Marjoribanks, Lord Tweedmouth, who bought the adjoining Guisachan Estate. The brewery generated a considerable fortune which financed the second baronet's lavish lifestyle. Sir Henry was elected MP for Hertfordshire in 1849. His mental health (it is likely he suffered from syphilis) deteriorated yet despite hardly being able to string a few words together he was re-elected in 1857. In 1858 he was the subject of a lunacy hearing at which he was declared insane but he held the seat until 1859. He survived for another twenty-five years.<br /> <br /> The estate was bought by Lady Cooper towards the end of the nineteenth century and then by Mr Orr-Ewing at the beginning of the twentieth century. He built the lodge seen here but it burned down in 1949 as the result of a chimney fire in the pantry. <br /> <br /> There is now a more modest lodge which houses an art gallery.<br /> <br /> A tunnel carrying water for the Garry-Moriston Hydro-Electric Scheme runs through the hills of the Ceannocroc Estate to Ceannacroc Power station, the first power station to be built underground.