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TITLE
Suisgill Lodge from the Parapet Pool, River Helmsdale
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_5609
PLACENAME
Suisgill
DISTRICT
Kildonan, Loth and Clyne
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Kildonan
PERIOD
1950s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
37233
KEYWORDS
postcards
lodges
estates
fishing
salmon
Ilie
Illie
Helmsdale
Robert Gilchrist
gold
Kildonan
Baile an Or
Suisgill Lodge from the Parapet Pool, River Helmsdale

This postcard shows Suisgill Lodge from the Parapet Pool, River Helmsdale, Sutherland.

Suisgill Estate was once part of the vast estates of the Duke and Duchess of Sutherland. 'Gil' from the Gaelic means ravine and 'suis' from the Norse could mean either roaring or saithe (coalfish). The lodge burned down in the 1980s.

The River Helmsdale is one of Scotland's great salmon rivers. The Greek astronomer and geographer Ptolemy (c100AD -170 AD) recorded a river -'ila fluvia ostia' - on Scotland's east coast which is thought to be the River Helmsdale. It is sometimes referred to as the Ilie or Illie.

The river rises from three linked lochs, Rimsdale, Badanloch and nan Clar. A journey of 21 miles (34 km) takes it through the Strath of Kildonan and the Suisgill Estate. It flows in to the sea at Helmsdale, a fishing village developed in 1818 for crofters cleared from the inland glens.

In 1868, Robert Gilchrist, a local man who had worked in the goldfields of Australia, found gold in the Helmsdale, sparking the Kildonan Gold-rush. By the following year 500 prospectors were living in wooden huts in 'Baile an Òr' (the village of gold). However disruption to the environment brought complaints from sportsman and fisherman and the granting of licences came to an end in December 1869.

The Kildonan, Kinbrace and Suisgill Burns were the richest sources of gold but a survey in 1911 found that there was not enough gold present in economically viable quantities.

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Suisgill Lodge from the Parapet Pool, River Helmsdale

SUTHERLAND: Kildonan

1950s

postcards; lodges; estates; fishing; salmon; Ilie; Illie; Helmsdale; Robert Gilchrist; gold; Kildonan; Baile an Or

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Suisgill Lodge from the Parapet Pool, River Helmsdale, Sutherland.<br /> <br /> Suisgill Estate was once part of the vast estates of the Duke and Duchess of Sutherland. 'Gil' from the Gaelic means ravine and 'suis' from the Norse could mean either roaring or saithe (coalfish). The lodge burned down in the 1980s.<br /> <br /> The River Helmsdale is one of Scotland's great salmon rivers. The Greek astronomer and geographer Ptolemy (c100AD -170 AD) recorded a river -'ila fluvia ostia' - on Scotland's east coast which is thought to be the River Helmsdale. It is sometimes referred to as the Ilie or Illie.<br /> <br /> The river rises from three linked lochs, Rimsdale, Badanloch and nan Clar. A journey of 21 miles (34 km) takes it through the Strath of Kildonan and the Suisgill Estate. It flows in to the sea at Helmsdale, a fishing village developed in 1818 for crofters cleared from the inland glens.<br /> <br /> In 1868, Robert Gilchrist, a local man who had worked in the goldfields of Australia, found gold in the Helmsdale, sparking the Kildonan Gold-rush. By the following year 500 prospectors were living in wooden huts in 'Baile an Òr' (the village of gold). However disruption to the environment brought complaints from sportsman and fisherman and the granting of licences came to an end in December 1869.<br /> <br /> The Kildonan, Kinbrace and Suisgill Burns were the richest sources of gold but a survey in 1911 found that there was not enough gold present in economically viable quantities.