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TITLE
Sailors going on board, Invergordon
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_5640
PLACENAME
Invergordon
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosskeen
PERIOD
1910s; 1920s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
37266
KEYWORDS
postcards
Sir William Gordon
Inverbreakie
Macleods
Cadboll
ports
harbours
Royal Navy
naval base
dockyards
firths<br />
Sailors going on board, Invergordon

This postcard shows sailors going on board, Invergordon.

In the early eighteenth century Sir William Gordon bought what was known as the estate of Inverbreakie and renamed it Invergordon. The name 'breakie' meaning 'dappled' probably came from a stream of that name which flows in to the Cromarty Firth east of the town. The place now occupied by the town was 'An Rudha Aonach Breacaidh' - the Point of Breakie Fair

By the time of the Statistical Account of Scotland (1791-99) there was a village of some size at the Ness of Invergordon where vessels of 100 tons could lie safely and load or unload their cargo close to the shore. Coal and lime were regularly brought in by sea.

A slipway was erected and after the estate was bought buy the Macleods of Cadboll, a harbour was built in 1828. A wooden jetty was added in 1837.

The New Statistical Account (1834-45) reported that steam ships were plying regularly from Invergordon to Inverness, Aberdeen, Leith and London. Grain was imported and livestock exported.

The Cromarty Firth has long been recognised as a deep, natural harbour. Its association with the Royal Navy began in the early the nineteenth century. In the early twentieth century Invergordon became an official naval base frequently visited by the Home Fleet.

Dockyard facilities, provision of coal and oil storage tanks were vital during both World Wars.

In September 1931 the British Atlantic Fleet arrived in Invergordon to the news that the Government intended to cut sailors' pay as part of attempts to deal with the Depression. The result was the Invergordon Mutiny when around a thousand sailors went on strike.

The naval base closed in 1956.

In the 1961 Invergordon Distillers Ltd established a grain distillery to the east of the town. The now Indian owned White & Mackay distillery still provides employment in the area.

At the end of the 1960s British Alcan began building an aluminium smelter. At the peak of production a thousand people worked at the smelter and it was one of the largest industrial works in the Highlands. Unfortunately it proved to be uneconomic and closed in December 1981.

There was a resurgence of development in the Cromarty Firth in the 1970s for the North Sea oil industry. An area east of the town at Nigg was seen as an ideal location for the fabrication of oilrigs. This has declined but Invergordon remains an important centre for maintenance and the giant structures continue to dominate the town.

In recent years the deep water and shelter offered by the firth has seen Invergordon become a regular port for liners.

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Sailors going on board, Invergordon

ROSS: Rosskeen

1910s; 1920s

postcards; Sir William Gordon; Inverbreakie; Macleods; Cadboll; ports; harbours; Royal Navy; naval base; dockyards; firths<br />

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows sailors going on board, Invergordon.<br /> <br /> In the early eighteenth century Sir William Gordon bought what was known as the estate of Inverbreakie and renamed it Invergordon. The name 'breakie' meaning 'dappled' probably came from a stream of that name which flows in to the Cromarty Firth east of the town. The place now occupied by the town was 'An Rudha Aonach Breacaidh' - the Point of Breakie Fair<br /> <br /> By the time of the Statistical Account of Scotland (1791-99) there was a village of some size at the Ness of Invergordon where vessels of 100 tons could lie safely and load or unload their cargo close to the shore. Coal and lime were regularly brought in by sea. <br /> <br /> A slipway was erected and after the estate was bought buy the Macleods of Cadboll, a harbour was built in 1828. A wooden jetty was added in 1837.<br /> <br /> The New Statistical Account (1834-45) reported that steam ships were plying regularly from Invergordon to Inverness, Aberdeen, Leith and London. Grain was imported and livestock exported.<br /> <br /> The Cromarty Firth has long been recognised as a deep, natural harbour. Its association with the Royal Navy began in the early the nineteenth century. In the early twentieth century Invergordon became an official naval base frequently visited by the Home Fleet. <br /> <br /> Dockyard facilities, provision of coal and oil storage tanks were vital during both World Wars.<br /> <br /> In September 1931 the British Atlantic Fleet arrived in Invergordon to the news that the Government intended to cut sailors' pay as part of attempts to deal with the Depression. The result was the Invergordon Mutiny when around a thousand sailors went on strike.<br /> <br /> The naval base closed in 1956.<br /> <br /> In the 1961 Invergordon Distillers Ltd established a grain distillery to the east of the town. The now Indian owned White & Mackay distillery still provides employment in the area. <br /> <br /> At the end of the 1960s British Alcan began building an aluminium smelter. At the peak of production a thousand people worked at the smelter and it was one of the largest industrial works in the Highlands. Unfortunately it proved to be uneconomic and closed in December 1981.<br /> <br /> There was a resurgence of development in the Cromarty Firth in the 1970s for the North Sea oil industry. An area east of the town at Nigg was seen as an ideal location for the fabrication of oilrigs. This has declined but Invergordon remains an important centre for maintenance and the giant structures continue to dominate the town. <br /> <br /> In recent years the deep water and shelter offered by the firth has seen Invergordon become a regular port for liners.