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Bridge on River Spey and Inch Parish Church, Kincraig

This postcard shows the bridge on the River Spey at Kincraig and Inch Parish Church.

The Boat of Insh Bridge is a wooden bridge with eight spans, two of the piers are masonry and the rest are solid wood. The work was completed by Charles Mackay, carpenter, of Inverness. The cost exceeded £1100.

The bridge was opened on 24th September 1869 by Charles Fraser-Mackintosh on behalf of The Mackintosh. Alexander Aeneas, the 27th chief of Clan Mackintosh, was only 14 when he succeeded his father. He was educated at Harrow and Cambridge. The estates were managed for him until 1873 by Charles Fraser-Mackintosh (MP for Inverness 1874-92)

This was one of three such bridges over the Spey. A fine one at Broomhill survives but one at Boat of Garten has been demolished.

Insh Parish Church is situated on the shore of Loch Insh. It is dedicated to St Adamnan (c625 - 704), St Columba's biographer, and is built on the site of an earlier chapel on a wooded knoll, Tom Eodhnain or Adamnan's Mound. Before Christianity came this glacial hillock was believed to be sacred to the Druids. It has been a place of Christian worship since the seventh century

The church has its origin in the 1700s. The present building dates from 1792 with some renovations from 1912 and 1963.

Within the building is an ancient cast-bronze bell which dates from the time of Adamnan and a stone basin which may have been the font from the earliest church.

The bell was believed to have healing or magical powers. It was once taken to Perth but the bell tolled 'Tom Eodhnain' over and over until it finally broke free and flew home. Thereafter it spent some time chained beside a window.

The settlement at the north end of Loch Insh, where a ferry crossed the River Spey, was originally called Boat of Insh. When the railway came in 1863 the station (now closed) was named Boat of Insh but the railway company renamed it Kincraig in 1871 when the bridge was built. The village followed suite.

Loch Insh, in the middle reaches of the River Spey, is in the Cairngorms National Park and is well known for water sports. Just south of the loch is the RSPB Inshes Marshes Nature Reserve, the most important wetlands in Britain and one of the most important in Europe. Lapwings, redshanks and curlews nest here; whooper swans and greylag geese are winter visitors

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Bridge on River Spey and Inch Parish Church, Kincraig

INVERNESS: Alvie

1900s

postcards; bridges; Boat of Insh; Insh; Charles Mackay; Charles Fraser-Mackintosh; Clan Mackintosh; churches; St Adamnan; bells; legends; ferries; River Spey; stations; lochs; nature reserves; RSPB

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows the bridge on the River Spey at Kincraig and Inch Parish Church.<br /> <br /> The Boat of Insh Bridge is a wooden bridge with eight spans, two of the piers are masonry and the rest are solid wood. The work was completed by Charles Mackay, carpenter, of Inverness. The cost exceeded £1100. <br /> <br /> The bridge was opened on 24th September 1869 by Charles Fraser-Mackintosh on behalf of The Mackintosh. Alexander Aeneas, the 27th chief of Clan Mackintosh, was only 14 when he succeeded his father. He was educated at Harrow and Cambridge. The estates were managed for him until 1873 by Charles Fraser-Mackintosh (MP for Inverness 1874-92)<br /> <br /> This was one of three such bridges over the Spey. A fine one at Broomhill survives but one at Boat of Garten has been demolished.<br /> <br /> Insh Parish Church is situated on the shore of Loch Insh. It is dedicated to St Adamnan (c625 - 704), St Columba's biographer, and is built on the site of an earlier chapel on a wooded knoll, Tom Eodhnain or Adamnan's Mound. Before Christianity came this glacial hillock was believed to be sacred to the Druids. It has been a place of Christian worship since the seventh century<br /> <br /> The church has its origin in the 1700s. The present building dates from 1792 with some renovations from 1912 and 1963. <br /> <br /> Within the building is an ancient cast-bronze bell which dates from the time of Adamnan and a stone basin which may have been the font from the earliest church.<br /> <br /> The bell was believed to have healing or magical powers. It was once taken to Perth but the bell tolled 'Tom Eodhnain' over and over until it finally broke free and flew home. Thereafter it spent some time chained beside a window.<br /> <br /> The settlement at the north end of Loch Insh, where a ferry crossed the River Spey, was originally called Boat of Insh. When the railway came in 1863 the station (now closed) was named Boat of Insh but the railway company renamed it Kincraig in 1871 when the bridge was built. The village followed suite.<br /> <br /> Loch Insh, in the middle reaches of the River Spey, is in the Cairngorms National Park and is well known for water sports. Just south of the loch is the RSPB Inshes Marshes Nature Reserve, the most important wetlands in Britain and one of the most important in Europe. Lapwings, redshanks and curlews nest here; whooper swans and greylag geese are winter visitors