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TITLE
Castle Roy and Established Church, Nethy Bridge
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_5799
PLACENAME
Castle Roy
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Abernethy and Kincardine
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
37436
KEYWORDS
architecture
building
buildings
Castle Roy and Established Church, Nethy Bridge

Castle Roy, located 1.3 km north of Nethy Bridge, is a simple early 13th century fortress, that is said to have been a stronghold of the Comyns. The church referred to on the postcard as the Established Church (an out-dated term for the Church of Scotland) is known as Nethy Bridge Parish Church and also as the 'Old Kirk'. The church was built in 1762 and in 1872-3 was expanded and remodelled by A. Marshall Mackenzie.

The village of Nethy Bridge itself lies approximately 8 km south southwest of Grantown-on-Spey. Until the arrival of the railway here in 1863, the village was known as Abernethy. It was renamed Nethy Bridge to differentiate it from another Abernethy village, at which the Great North of Scotland Railway line already stopped. The name Nethy Bridge refers to the three-arch bridge in the village, designed by Thomas Telford and completed in 1806. The railway line that ran through Nethy Bridge closed in the 1960s.

The timber trade was central to the local economy in the 18th and 18th centuries and there were a number of sawmills in the local area. During World War 2, men from the Canadian Forestry Corps and the Newfoundland Navy were based in camps at Abernethy Forest, harvesting and processing Scots Pine for the war effort.

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Castle Roy and Established Church, Nethy Bridge

INVERNESS: Abernethy and Kincardine

architecture; building; buildings

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

Castle Roy, located 1.3 km north of Nethy Bridge, is a simple early 13th century fortress, that is said to have been a stronghold of the Comyns. The church referred to on the postcard as the Established Church (an out-dated term for the Church of Scotland) is known as Nethy Bridge Parish Church and also as the 'Old Kirk'. The church was built in 1762 and in 1872-3 was expanded and remodelled by A. Marshall Mackenzie. <br /> <br /> The village of Nethy Bridge itself lies approximately 8 km south southwest of Grantown-on-Spey. Until the arrival of the railway here in 1863, the village was known as Abernethy. It was renamed Nethy Bridge to differentiate it from another Abernethy village, at which the Great North of Scotland Railway line already stopped. The name Nethy Bridge refers to the three-arch bridge in the village, designed by Thomas Telford and completed in 1806. The railway line that ran through Nethy Bridge closed in the 1960s.<br /> <br /> The timber trade was central to the local economy in the 18th and 18th centuries and there were a number of sawmills in the local area. During World War 2, men from the Canadian Forestry Corps and the Newfoundland Navy were based in camps at Abernethy Forest, harvesting and processing Scots Pine for the war effort.