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TITLE
Palace Road, Kirkwall, Showing Tankerness House Gateway
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_5813
PLACENAME
Kirkwall
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
37450
KEYWORDS
architecture
Palace Road, Kirkwall, Showing Tankerness House Gateway

This postcard is titled, 'Palace Road, Kirkwall, Showing Tankerness House Gateway'. It shows a girl crossing Palace Road, and a number of stone-built crow stepped buildings. Tankerness House and gateway, on Broad Street, are also seen.

Kirkwall is Orkney's largest town and first came to prominence in the mid-twelfth century, after Earl Rognvald's decision to relocate the cathedral church of Orkney and the bishop's residence from Birsay to Kirkwall. Earl Rognvald began the construction of the cathedral in Kirkwall in 1137 which was named St Magnus Cathedral after Earl Rognvald's uncle, Earl Magnus, who had been canonised by Bishop William the Old in 1136.

Tankerness House sits nearly opposite to St Magnus Cathedral. The earliest part of Tankerness House, which includes the northern range and the gateway shown in this image, dates from 1574 and was built for Gilbert Furzie, Minister of Kirkwall and Archdeacon of Orkney. James Baikie of Tankerness, a Kirkwall merchant, renamed the building Tankerness House after he purchased it in 1641. Tankerness House was restored in 1968 and is now home to Orkney Museum.

In the late eighteenth century, Kirkwall benefited from the growth of the kelp industry in Orkney, although the collapse of this industry around 1830 temporarily halted the town's expansion which resumed again in the late nineteenth century.

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Palace Road, Kirkwall, Showing Tankerness House Gateway

architecture

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard is titled, 'Palace Road, Kirkwall, Showing Tankerness House Gateway'. It shows a girl crossing Palace Road, and a number of stone-built crow stepped buildings. Tankerness House and gateway, on Broad Street, are also seen.<br /> <br /> Kirkwall is Orkney's largest town and first came to prominence in the mid-twelfth century, after Earl Rognvald's decision to relocate the cathedral church of Orkney and the bishop's residence from Birsay to Kirkwall. Earl Rognvald began the construction of the cathedral in Kirkwall in 1137 which was named St Magnus Cathedral after Earl Rognvald's uncle, Earl Magnus, who had been canonised by Bishop William the Old in 1136. <br /> <br /> Tankerness House sits nearly opposite to St Magnus Cathedral. The earliest part of Tankerness House, which includes the northern range and the gateway shown in this image, dates from 1574 and was built for Gilbert Furzie, Minister of Kirkwall and Archdeacon of Orkney. James Baikie of Tankerness, a Kirkwall merchant, renamed the building Tankerness House after he purchased it in 1641. Tankerness House was restored in 1968 and is now home to Orkney Museum. <br /> <br /> In the late eighteenth century, Kirkwall benefited from the growth of the kelp industry in Orkney, although the collapse of this industry around 1830 temporarily halted the town's expansion which resumed again in the late nineteenth century.