Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Aerial View of Tain from the North
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_5897
PLACENAME
Tain
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Tain
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
37530
KEYWORDS
Ross and Cromarty
Aerial View of Tain from the North

This postcard is titled 'Aerial View of Tain From the North'.

Tain was an important centre of medieval pilgrimage to the remains of St. Duthac (or Duthus), who was born in Tain around 1000 AD. Indeed, the town's Gaelic name is 'Baile Dhubhthaich', or 'Duthac's Town'. St. Duthac's remains were originally housed in a 13th century chapel on the links on the outskirts of Tain, but were later transferred to what is now the Collegiate Church of St. Duthac.

St. Duthac's shrine also acted as a sanctuary. Known as the Girth of Tain, the sanctuary extended to about 12 square miles and was under protection of the church. Robert the Bruce's wife, daughter and sister sought sanctuary there in 1306, but were captured by William, Earl of Ross, and handed over to English forces.

King James IV of Scotland made at least 18 pilgrimages to the shrine of St. Duthac between 1493 and 1513. His visits undoubtedly raised its profile and by the late middle ages St. Duthac's shrine was one of the most popular places of pilgrimage in Scotland. The practice of pilgrimage to Tain and to other shrines ceased after the Reformation of 1560.

It is often claimed that Tain was created a royal burgh by Malcolm Canmore in 1066, although the earliest surviving charter was granted by James VI in 1587.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Aerial View of Tain from the North

ROSS: Tain

Ross and Cromarty

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard is titled 'Aerial View of Tain From the North'.<br /> <br /> Tain was an important centre of medieval pilgrimage to the remains of St. Duthac (or Duthus), who was born in Tain around 1000 AD. Indeed, the town's Gaelic name is 'Baile Dhubhthaich', or 'Duthac's Town'. St. Duthac's remains were originally housed in a 13th century chapel on the links on the outskirts of Tain, but were later transferred to what is now the Collegiate Church of St. Duthac. <br /> <br /> St. Duthac's shrine also acted as a sanctuary. Known as the Girth of Tain, the sanctuary extended to about 12 square miles and was under protection of the church. Robert the Bruce's wife, daughter and sister sought sanctuary there in 1306, but were captured by William, Earl of Ross, and handed over to English forces. <br /> <br /> King James IV of Scotland made at least 18 pilgrimages to the shrine of St. Duthac between 1493 and 1513. His visits undoubtedly raised its profile and by the late middle ages St. Duthac's shrine was one of the most popular places of pilgrimage in Scotland. The practice of pilgrimage to Tain and to other shrines ceased after the Reformation of 1560. <br /> <br /> It is often claimed that Tain was created a royal burgh by Malcolm Canmore in 1066, although the earliest surviving charter was granted by James VI in 1587.