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TITLE
High Street from East, Fortrose
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_5945
PLACENAME
Fortrose
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
37583
KEYWORDS
building
buildings
people
men
bicycle
clothing
dress
High Street from East, Fortrose

This postcard shows the High Street in Fortrose, a small town on the Black Isle, Inverness-shire.

In 1124, the first cathedral of the diocese of Ross was established in the neighbouring settlement of Rosemarkie by David I of Scotland. In the mid-thirteenth century a new cathedral was built in Fortrose, and the site of the cathedral church of Ross moved here. Indeed, Fortrose was originally known as Chanonry, due to the canons of the cathedral who lived in manses around the church. The cathedral largely fell into disrepair following the Reformation of 1560.

By 1590, Fortrose had become a royal burgh, but the settlement does not to appear to have prospered greatly as a result. John Gifford, in his book "The Buildings of Scotland: Highlands and Islands" quotes from a Town Council report of 1691 which stated that Fortrose, "have no trade by merchandizeing nor ever hade that wee know or can learne of, being but a little village."

The harbour at Fortrose, designed by Thomas Telford, was constructed between 1813 and 1817. In February 1894, a branch line of the Highland Railway was opened to Fortrose, aiding the settlement's development as a tourist resort. The station was closed to passengers in 1951.

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High Street from East, Fortrose

ROSS: Rosemarkie

building; buildings; people; men; bicycle; clothing; dress

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows the High Street in Fortrose, a small town on the Black Isle, Inverness-shire. <br /> <br /> In 1124, the first cathedral of the diocese of Ross was established in the neighbouring settlement of Rosemarkie by David I of Scotland. In the mid-thirteenth century a new cathedral was built in Fortrose, and the site of the cathedral church of Ross moved here. Indeed, Fortrose was originally known as Chanonry, due to the canons of the cathedral who lived in manses around the church. The cathedral largely fell into disrepair following the Reformation of 1560.<br /> <br /> By 1590, Fortrose had become a royal burgh, but the settlement does not to appear to have prospered greatly as a result. John Gifford, in his book "The Buildings of Scotland: Highlands and Islands" quotes from a Town Council report of 1691 which stated that Fortrose, "have no trade by merchandizeing nor ever hade that wee know or can learne of, being but a little village."<br /> <br /> The harbour at Fortrose, designed by Thomas Telford, was constructed between 1813 and 1817. In February 1894, a branch line of the Highland Railway was opened to Fortrose, aiding the settlement's development as a tourist resort. The station was closed to passengers in 1951.