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TITLE
Ye Booke of Halkirk [1911], page photograph of Clack-na-Ciplich
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_HALKIRK_060111_016A
PLACENAME
Halkirk
DISTRICT
Caithness - Western
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Halkirk
DATE OF IMAGE
1911
PERIOD
1910s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
37835
KEYWORDS
villages
place names
pictish stones
Ye Booke of Halkirk [1911], page photograph of Clack-na-Ciplich

Page 16a of a booklet entitled 'Ye Booke of Halkirk - A Ross Institute Souvenir' published in 1911.

This page contains a photograph of Clach-na-Ciplich a cross-incised slab situated in a remote location in the Caithness Peatlands which probably dates from the 1500s or earlier.

The Ross Institute was a building originally erected by John Ross, later Sir John Ross of Dunedin, New Zealand, who was born at Gerston, Halkirk, in November 1834. It was officially opened on 8 March, 1912 by his eldest son John Sutherland Ross. He gifted it to the people of this Parish in 1913. Completely renovated in 1997 it was re-opened by his great grandson, William Thomas Fergus Ross, of Dunedin, on 30 August 1997.

Halkirk is a small village situated 6 miles south of Thurso in Caithness.

The derivation of the place name Halkirk is a Norse form of ecclesiastical origin. It appears as Ha-kirkju in the Norse sagas, takes the forms of Haukirc and Haukyrc in two Latin documents of the thirteenth century, and is to the present day pronounced Haekirc by Gaelic speakers. The last limb is undoubtedly the Norse word for 'kirk,' and the first member is almost certainly the feminine form Ha of a Norse adjective, meaning 'high.' Hence Halkirk means 'High Kirk,' but why so called remains uncertain. It is quite possible that Hoy, a place-name in the immediate neighbourhood, also meaning 'high,' gave its designation to the kirk, and that in the name Halkirk Hoy lies concealed.

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Ye Booke of Halkirk [1911], page photograph of Clack-na-Ciplich

CAITHNESS: Halkirk

1910s

villages; place names; pictish stones

Highland Libraries

Ye Booke of Halkirk, 1911

Page 16a of a booklet entitled 'Ye Booke of Halkirk - A Ross Institute Souvenir' published in 1911.<br /> <br /> This page contains a photograph of Clach-na-Ciplich a cross-incised slab situated in a remote location in the Caithness Peatlands which probably dates from the 1500s or earlier.<br /> <br /> The Ross Institute was a building originally erected by John Ross, later Sir John Ross of Dunedin, New Zealand, who was born at Gerston, Halkirk, in November 1834. It was officially opened on 8 March, 1912 by his eldest son John Sutherland Ross. He gifted it to the people of this Parish in 1913. Completely renovated in 1997 it was re-opened by his great grandson, William Thomas Fergus Ross, of Dunedin, on 30 August 1997.<br /> <br /> Halkirk is a small village situated 6 miles south of Thurso in Caithness.<br /> <br /> The derivation of the place name Halkirk is a Norse form of ecclesiastical origin. It appears as Ha-kirkju in the Norse sagas, takes the forms of Haukirc and Haukyrc in two Latin documents of the thirteenth century, and is to the present day pronounced Haekirc by Gaelic speakers. The last limb is undoubtedly the Norse word for 'kirk,' and the first member is almost certainly the feminine form Ha of a Norse adjective, meaning 'high.' Hence Halkirk means 'High Kirk,' but why so called remains uncertain. It is quite possible that Hoy, a place-name in the immediate neighbourhood, also meaning 'high,' gave its designation to the kirk, and that in the name Halkirk Hoy lies concealed.