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TITLE
Ruined Blackhouse, Strome, Benbecula, 1963
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_PHOTOGRAPHS_002
PLACENAME
Strome
DISTRICT
South Uist
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: South Uist
DATE OF IMAGE
1963
PERIOD
1960s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
38104
KEYWORDS
housing
cottage
crofthouse
blackhouse
Ruined Blackhouse, Strome, Benbecula, 1963

This image is titled 'Ruined Blackhouse, Strome, Benbecula, 1963', and shows a cluster of ruined cottages. The cottages have low walls with rounded corners that were streamlined against the wind. Chimney flues have been added to some of the cottages, to accommodate a more modern fireplace or stove.

The thatching on the cottages is in various states of repair. The roof of the cottage in the centre of the image has fallen away to reveal the timber framework, which formed the basis of the roof of a traditional Highland cottage. Sods of earth, and then a layer of thatch, were placed over the timber framework. In the Outer Hebrides, straw, bent grass or a mixture of the two, were the traditional thatching materials.

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Ruined Blackhouse, Strome, Benbecula, 1963

INVERNESS: South Uist

1960s

housing; cottage; crofthouse; blackhouse

Highland Libraries

This image is titled 'Ruined Blackhouse, Strome, Benbecula, 1963', and shows a cluster of ruined cottages. The cottages have low walls with rounded corners that were streamlined against the wind. Chimney flues have been added to some of the cottages, to accommodate a more modern fireplace or stove. <br /> <br /> The thatching on the cottages is in various states of repair. The roof of the cottage in the centre of the image has fallen away to reveal the timber framework, which formed the basis of the roof of a traditional Highland cottage. Sods of earth, and then a layer of thatch, were placed over the timber framework. In the Outer Hebrides, straw, bent grass or a mixture of the two, were the traditional thatching materials.