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TITLE
Fall of Fyers (Foyers) near Loch Ness
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_U_172_P005
PLACENAME
Falls of Foyers
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Boleskine and Abertarff
DATE OF IMAGE
1788
PERIOD
1780s
CREATOR
Peter Mazell
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
38308
KEYWORDS
waterfalls
rivers
gorges
hydro-electricity
Fall of Fyers (Foyers) near Loch Ness

In its final mile from the Monadhliath Mountains to Loch Ness, the River Foyers drops 450ft. The result is a pair of waterfalls, the first being 30ft and the second 90ft. In 1896 the falls provided Scotland with its first hydro-electric scheme when they were harnessed to provide power for an aluminium smelter. There is still a hydro-electric scheme there and the former aluminium works are now a power station. The volume of water over the falls has reduced since the coming of hydro-electricity but they are still an impressive sight.

This illustration was taken from 'Remarkable Ruins and Romantic Prospects', by Charles Cordiner (1788)

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Fall of Fyers (Foyers) near Loch Ness

INVERNESS: Boleskine and Abertarff

1780s

waterfalls; rivers; gorges; hydro-electricity

Highland Libraries

Remarkable Ruins and Romantic Prospects

In its final mile from the Monadhliath Mountains to Loch Ness, the River Foyers drops 450ft. The result is a pair of waterfalls, the first being 30ft and the second 90ft. In 1896 the falls provided Scotland with its first hydro-electric scheme when they were harnessed to provide power for an aluminium smelter. There is still a hydro-electric scheme there and the former aluminium works are now a power station. The volume of water over the falls has reduced since the coming of hydro-electricity but they are still an impressive sight.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Remarkable Ruins and Romantic Prospects', by Charles Cordiner (1788)