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TITLE
View of Loch Ness from the Black Rock
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_U_172_P008
PLACENAME
Loch Ness (Inverfarigaig)
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Boleskine and Abertarff
DATE OF IMAGE
1788
PERIOD
1780s
CREATOR
Peter Mazell
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
38311
KEYWORDS
rocks
lochs
glens
monsters
saints
roads
View of Loch Ness from the Black Rock

Loch Ness is the largest of three lochs in the Great Glen. It is 23 miles long, 1 mile wide and has an average depth of 600ft. This gives Loch Ness the largest volume of water in any loch or lake in Great Britain. The loch is also said to be the home of the monster which was first seen by St Columba in the 6th century. This illustration shows the view from Black Rock, which can be found about half a mile from Inverfarigaig. When General Wade built his military roads after the 1715 Jacobite Rising he had to blast through this rock, a great engineering achievement at the time.

This illustration was taken from 'Remarkable Ruins and Romantic Prospects', by Charles Cordiner (1788)

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View of Loch Ness from the Black Rock

INVERNESS: Boleskine and Abertarff

1780s

rocks; lochs; glens; monsters; saints; roads

Highland Libraries

Remarkable Ruins and Romantic Prospects

Loch Ness is the largest of three lochs in the Great Glen. It is 23 miles long, 1 mile wide and has an average depth of 600ft. This gives Loch Ness the largest volume of water in any loch or lake in Great Britain. The loch is also said to be the home of the monster which was first seen by St Columba in the 6th century. This illustration shows the view from Black Rock, which can be found about half a mile from Inverfarigaig. When General Wade built his military roads after the 1715 Jacobite Rising he had to blast through this rock, a great engineering achievement at the time.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Remarkable Ruins and Romantic Prospects', by Charles Cordiner (1788)