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TITLE
Beaulieu Abbey or Beauly Priory
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_U_172_P017
PLACENAME
Beauly
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmorack
DATE OF IMAGE
1788
PERIOD
1780s
CREATOR
Peter Mazell
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
38319
KEYWORDS
priories
monasteries
monks
religion
buildings
ruins
Beaulieu Abbey or Beauly Priory

Beauly Priory was one of three founded in Scotland by the Valliscaulian order from Burgundy in France, after 1230. It was referred to by the monks as 'Prioratus de Bello Loco' (priory of the lovely place). The monastery was completed in 1272. In 1430, Sir Hugh Fraser of Lovat complained to the Pope that the priory was decaying due to mismanagement. A restoration programme was set up to repair the damage. In 1510 the priory changed its allegiance to the Cistercian order but after the Reformation it fell out of use. The lead was removed from the roof in 1582 and some stones used to build Cromwell's Citadel in Inverness in 1652.

The north transept of the priory was rebuilt by the architect Alexander Ross in 1901 as a mausoleum for the Mackenzie family. The priory later passed into state control and is now looked after by Historic Scotland.

Beaulieu is the French for 'beautiful place'. The name is said to derive from a comment made by Mary Queen of Scots on a visit to the area but it actually dates back to the French monks.

This illustration was taken from 'Remarkable Ruins and Romantic Prospects', by Charles Cordiner (1788)

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Beaulieu Abbey or Beauly Priory

INVERNESS: Kilmorack

1780s

priories; monasteries; monks; religion; buildings; ruins

Highland Libraries

Remarkable Ruins and Romantic Prospects

Beauly Priory was one of three founded in Scotland by the Valliscaulian order from Burgundy in France, after 1230. It was referred to by the monks as 'Prioratus de Bello Loco' (priory of the lovely place). The monastery was completed in 1272. In 1430, Sir Hugh Fraser of Lovat complained to the Pope that the priory was decaying due to mismanagement. A restoration programme was set up to repair the damage. In 1510 the priory changed its allegiance to the Cistercian order but after the Reformation it fell out of use. The lead was removed from the roof in 1582 and some stones used to build Cromwell's Citadel in Inverness in 1652.<br /> <br /> The north transept of the priory was rebuilt by the architect Alexander Ross in 1901 as a mausoleum for the Mackenzie family. The priory later passed into state control and is now looked after by Historic Scotland.<br /> <br /> Beaulieu is the French for 'beautiful place'. The name is said to derive from a comment made by Mary Queen of Scots on a visit to the area but it actually dates back to the French monks.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Remarkable Ruins and Romantic Prospects', by Charles Cordiner (1788)