Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Kyle of Lochalsh and Highland Cattle
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_U_8131048_P021
PLACENAME
Kyle of Lochalsh
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochalsh
PERIOD
1900s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
38344
KEYWORDS
cows
cattle
bulls
horns
towns
villages
railways
ferries
piers
Kyle of Lochalsh and Highland Cattle

It is thought that there has been a settlement at Kyle of Lochalsh since 1600. It was the main terminal for ferries to the Isle of Skye and, when the railway arrived in 1897, it became the main terminal for ferries to Stornoway until 1973. Kyle grew significantly with the coming of the railway as accommodation, shops, a library and a hotel had to be built for the railway staff. Kyle remained the ferry terminal for Skye until 1995, when the Skye bridge opened.

Highland Cattle have probably been bred in Scotland since the 6th century. There were originally two main breeds. The smaller black variety was found mainly on the islands. They were hardier but took longer to develop and were superseded by the red variety found on the mainland. Highland Cattle are known for their horns, on both the male and female, and their shaggy coats. Females can weigh up to a ton while males are often heavier. They are the oldest registered breed of European beef cattle.

This photograph is from the book 'Picturesque Ross-shire, Strathpeffer and Dingwall' published in Dingwall, circa 1900

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Kyle of Lochalsh and Highland Cattle

ROSS: Lochalsh

1900s

cows; cattle; bulls; horns; towns; villages; railways; ferries; piers

Highland Libraries

It is thought that there has been a settlement at Kyle of Lochalsh since 1600. It was the main terminal for ferries to the Isle of Skye and, when the railway arrived in 1897, it became the main terminal for ferries to Stornoway until 1973. Kyle grew significantly with the coming of the railway as accommodation, shops, a library and a hotel had to be built for the railway staff. Kyle remained the ferry terminal for Skye until 1995, when the Skye bridge opened.<br /> <br /> Highland Cattle have probably been bred in Scotland since the 6th century. There were originally two main breeds. The smaller black variety was found mainly on the islands. They were hardier but took longer to develop and were superseded by the red variety found on the mainland. Highland Cattle are known for their horns, on both the male and female, and their shaggy coats. Females can weigh up to a ton while males are often heavier. They are the oldest registered breed of European beef cattle.<br /> <br /> This photograph is from the book 'Picturesque Ross-shire, Strathpeffer and Dingwall' published in Dingwall, circa 1900