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TITLE
Carrying finished tweeds, Isle of Harris
EXTERNAL ID
QZP99_93154_04_06
PLACENAME
Harris
DISTRICT
Harris
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Harris
SOURCE
Edinburgh and Scottish Collection, Edinburgh Central Library
ASSET ID
38501
KEYWORDS
Harris Tweed
industries
weaving
looms
cloth
islands
Carrying finished tweeds, Isle of Harris

The Harris Tweed industry began when Lady Dunmore recognised the market value of the cloth woven by two sisters from Strond in the mid-19th century. They had been trained in Paisley and could produce cloth that was superior to their neighbour's. Lady Dunmore marketed the cloth to her friends and the tweed industry grew as the popularity of the cloth grew.

In the beginning all the work was done by hand but now the spinning, dyeing and finishing processes are done in mills. The weaving of the tweed is still done by crofter-weavers in their own homes on their own looms. The cloth and its Orb mark are protected by law and all material has to be dyed, spun, woven and finished in the Outer Hebrides. The tweed was originally woven on wooden hand looms but these were replaced in the 1920s by the Hattersley single-width domestic loom. These looms are now being replaced by the Bonas-Griffith loom which can weave double-width fabric


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Carrying finished tweeds, Isle of Harris

INVERNESS: Harris

Harris Tweed; industries; weaving; looms; cloth; islands

Edinburgh and Scottish Collection, Edinburgh Central Library

I F Grant Photographic Archive

The Harris Tweed industry began when Lady Dunmore recognised the market value of the cloth woven by two sisters from Strond in the mid-19th century. They had been trained in Paisley and could produce cloth that was superior to their neighbour's. Lady Dunmore marketed the cloth to her friends and the tweed industry grew as the popularity of the cloth grew.<br /> <br /> In the beginning all the work was done by hand but now the spinning, dyeing and finishing processes are done in mills. The weaving of the tweed is still done by crofter-weavers in their own homes on their own looms. The cloth and its Orb mark are protected by law and all material has to be dyed, spun, woven and finished in the Outer Hebrides. The tweed was originally woven on wooden hand looms but these were replaced in the 1920s by the Hattersley single-width domestic loom. These looms are now being replaced by the Bonas-Griffith loom which can weave double-width fabric <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: central.edsc.library@edinburgh.gov.uk">Edinburgh Central Library</a><br />