Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Deer stalking at Rothiemurchus
EXTERNAL ID
QZP99_94052_09_06
PLACENAME
Rothiemurchus
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Duthil and Rothiemurchus
CREATOR
D Whyte
SOURCE
Edinburgh and Scottish Collection, Edinburgh Central Library
ASSET ID
38662
KEYWORDS
deer
stalking
hunting
estates
land management
horses
deerstalking
Deer stalking at Rothiemurchus

This photograph shows four men out deer stalking. One of the ponies with them has a dead stag across its back. The photograph is from the collection of Dr I. F. Grant, depicting rural life in the Highlands and Islands in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

Deer stalking was popular throughout the 19th century but it was given a royal seal of approval when Queen Victoria bought the Balmoral estate in 1852. Wealthy people began to buy or rent their own Highland estates and build great shooting lodges. These new landowners were keen to increase the numbers of deer as they believed this improved their chances of good trophy stags. A great deal of skill and patience is required for deer stalking as the process can take time. It involves tracking the animals and stealthy manoeuvring into a position for the best shot.

During the 1950s deer numbers were assessed. In 1959 the Red Deer Commission was established and they set up closed seasons when deer could not be shot. As deer can cause considerable damage to the countryside when their numbers exceed their natural food supply, deer herds have to be carefully maintained. Today deer stalking is undertaken primarily to control deer numbers. Older and weaker deer are selected so that the healthy deer have a better chance of survival.

The Rothiemurchus Estate was under the administration of the Bishop of Moray until the late 1500s when John Grant of Freuchie obtained the lease and a Royal Charter. The Grants have owned the estate ever since.

This photograph was taken for the Highland Railways


This image can be purchased.
For further information about purchasing and prices please email
Edinburgh Central Library

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Deer stalking at Rothiemurchus

INVERNESS: Duthil and Rothiemurchus

deer; stalking; hunting; estates; land management; horses; deerstalking

Edinburgh and Scottish Collection, Edinburgh Central Library

I F Grant Photographic Archive

This photograph shows four men out deer stalking. One of the ponies with them has a dead stag across its back. The photograph is from the collection of Dr I. F. Grant, depicting rural life in the Highlands and Islands in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.<br /> <br /> Deer stalking was popular throughout the 19th century but it was given a royal seal of approval when Queen Victoria bought the Balmoral estate in 1852. Wealthy people began to buy or rent their own Highland estates and build great shooting lodges. These new landowners were keen to increase the numbers of deer as they believed this improved their chances of good trophy stags. A great deal of skill and patience is required for deer stalking as the process can take time. It involves tracking the animals and stealthy manoeuvring into a position for the best shot. <br /> <br /> During the 1950s deer numbers were assessed. In 1959 the Red Deer Commission was established and they set up closed seasons when deer could not be shot. As deer can cause considerable damage to the countryside when their numbers exceed their natural food supply, deer herds have to be carefully maintained. Today deer stalking is undertaken primarily to control deer numbers. Older and weaker deer are selected so that the healthy deer have a better chance of survival. <br /> <br /> The Rothiemurchus Estate was under the administration of the Bishop of Moray until the late 1500s when John Grant of Freuchie obtained the lease and a Royal Charter. The Grants have owned the estate ever since.<br /> <br /> This photograph was taken for the Highland Railways <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: central.edsc.library@edinburgh.gov.uk">Edinburgh Central Library</a><br />