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TITLE
Black House near Butt of Lewis
EXTERNAL ID
QZP99_94157_03_03
PLACENAME
Butt of Lewis
DISTRICT
Lewis
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Barvas
SOURCE
Edinburgh and Scottish Collection, Edinburgh Central Library
ASSET ID
38762
KEYWORDS
houses
dwellings
blackhouses
lighthouses
coasts
islands
Black House near Butt of Lewis

The Butt of Lewis is the most northerly point of Lewis and of the Western Isles. It is beyond the settlements of Port of Ness and Eoropaidh and is home to a lighthouse built in 1862 by David and Thomas Stevenson. The light was automated in 1998.

Black houses were common across Lewis. The houses were long and narrow with an outer and an inner wall of un-mortared stones. The gap was filled with earth and peat. They were usually thatched and generally had no chimney. A family and their animals would live under the same roof. The term 'black house' distinguished these houses from the new houses introduced to the islands in the middle of the 19th century which were coated in lime wash and called 'white houses'


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Black House near Butt of Lewis

ROSS: Barvas

houses; dwellings; blackhouses; lighthouses; coasts; islands

Edinburgh and Scottish Collection, Edinburgh Central Library

I F Grant Photographic Archive

The Butt of Lewis is the most northerly point of Lewis and of the Western Isles. It is beyond the settlements of Port of Ness and Eoropaidh and is home to a lighthouse built in 1862 by David and Thomas Stevenson. The light was automated in 1998.<br /> <br /> Black houses were common across Lewis. The houses were long and narrow with an outer and an inner wall of un-mortared stones. The gap was filled with earth and peat. They were usually thatched and generally had no chimney. A family and their animals would live under the same roof. The term 'black house' distinguished these houses from the new houses introduced to the islands in the middle of the 19th century which were coated in lime wash and called 'white houses' <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: central.edsc.library@edinburgh.gov.uk">Edinburgh Central Library</a><br />