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TITLE
Croft house with primitive chimney, Fort Augustus
EXTERNAL ID
QZP99_94157_07_03
PLACENAME
Fort Augustus
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Boleskine and Abertarff
SOURCE
Edinburgh and Scottish Collection, Edinburgh Central Library
ASSET ID
38789
KEYWORDS
houses
dwellings
buildings
roofs
chimneys
construction
Croft house with primitive chimney, Fort Augustus

Most croft houses were thatched. Thatching was a common way to roof houses as the material was light and did not put unnecessary weight on the walls. Older cottages did not have gable ends or chimneys because the fire inside was in the middle of the floor. As central fires moved closer to the walls chimneys were constructed. Early chimneys were canopies extending from the wall inside the house and led the smoke up through the roof. They were often made with wattle and sods. Later, stone flues were built into the wall of a house


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Croft house with primitive chimney, Fort Augustus

INVERNESS: Boleskine and Abertarff

houses; dwellings; buildings; roofs; chimneys; construction

Edinburgh and Scottish Collection, Edinburgh Central Library

I F Grant Photographic Archive

Most croft houses were thatched. Thatching was a common way to roof houses as the material was light and did not put unnecessary weight on the walls. Older cottages did not have gable ends or chimneys because the fire inside was in the middle of the floor. As central fires moved closer to the walls chimneys were constructed. Early chimneys were canopies extending from the wall inside the house and led the smoke up through the roof. They were often made with wattle and sods. Later, stone flues were built into the wall of a house <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: central.edsc.library@edinburgh.gov.uk">Edinburgh Central Library</a>