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TITLE
Highland Connections with the Titanic, part 1 of 3
EXTERNAL ID
RMS_TITANIC_01
DATE OF IMAGE
1912
PERIOD
1910s
ASSET ID
39001
KEYWORDS
ships
disasters
Highland Connections with the Titanic, part 1 of 3

Successive generations of Aberdeen local studies students have looked in vain for that apocryphal newspaper headline, reporting on the Titanic disaster, in which 1514 people died: 'Aberdeen man lost at sea'.

However, in the Aberdeen People's Journal for 20th April 1912, one of the 28 Scots identified as being on board the RMS Titanic is James Fraser, a fireman/stoker. Records in the National Archives give his age as 30 and his place of birth as Inverness, although the Aberdeen newspaper claims him as one of their own. The headline is: SCOTLAND'S ANXIETY. Aberdeen People on Board.

James Fraser had been transferred to the Titanic from another White Star vessel, the Oceanic. He was married, with a wife and two young children living in Southampton, from where the maiden voyage of the Titanic set sail on April 10th. His monthly wage as a fireman or stoker was £6-0-0d; a 'leading fireman' would earn 10/- a month more. He had signed on for the Titanic on 6th April.

The Inverness Courier for 12th April 1912 reported on Census results, arising out of the 1911 Census, and on the marriage in London of the Marquis of Stafford, son of the Duke and Duchess of Sutherland, at St Peter's, Eaton Square, Belgravia - 'a gathering both large and fashionable'. Sensibly, they elected to spend their honeymoon at Dunrobin Castle and not in North America.

In the Courier for 16th April they had reached Golspie: 'Rejoicings in the North'. A coal strike had just been settled (causing some disrupted passengers to transfer to the Titanic) and at Tobermory, the salvage steamer Tritan was starting a search for Spanish treasure. Another Irish Home Rule Bill was passing through Parliament and then, on page 5:

LINER'S PERIL
TITANIC STRIKES AN ICEBERG AND SINKS
2358 LIVES IN DANGER
A CALL FOR HELP


Early reports were optimistic - the Press Association reported that Mr and Mrs Phillips, of Faracombe, Godalming, had received a telegram from their son: 'Making slowly for Halifax; practically unsinkable; don't worry.' (He did not survive.) The Titanic had left Southampton on its maiden voyage on the previous Wednesday, April 10th. Built at Harland & Wolff, Belfast, it weighed 46,382 tons and cost over £1 million to build. The ship struck an iceberg half way through its journey to New York, late on the night of 14th April and sank early on the morning of the 15th, in less than three hours. Initial figures for passengers and crew were as follows:

First Class 350
Second Class 305
Third Class 800
Crew 903
Total 2358

At the very end of this first report the Reuter's news agency is quoted as saying that 'many lives were lost'.

The actual figures for passenger and crew were slightly different:

First Class 325
Second Class 285
Third Class 706
Crew 908
Total 2224

On the maiden voyage the ship was well under capacity, with 1316 passengers on board compared to a possible 2566. There were numerous examples of people joining the Titanic at the last minute, or changing their plans and travelling on other ships, so it was some time before agreed figures emerged, and even then it was admitted that total accuracy could not be guaranteed. The best estimates are that 710 survived and 1514 perished, of which 696 were crew.


The photograph shows the Titanic leaving Belfast on her sea trials. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.

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Highland Connections with the Titanic, part 1 of 3

1910s

ships; disasters

Highland Connections with the Titanic

Successive generations of Aberdeen local studies students have looked in vain for that apocryphal newspaper headline, reporting on the Titanic disaster, in which 1514 people died: 'Aberdeen man lost at sea'.<br /> <br /> However, in the Aberdeen People's Journal for 20th April 1912, one of the 28 Scots identified as being on board the RMS Titanic is James Fraser, a fireman/stoker. Records in the National Archives give his age as 30 and his place of birth as Inverness, although the Aberdeen newspaper claims him as one of their own. The headline is: <b>SCOTLAND'S ANXIETY. Aberdeen People on Board.</b><br /> <br /> James Fraser had been transferred to the Titanic from another White Star vessel, the Oceanic. He was married, with a wife and two young children living in Southampton, from where the maiden voyage of the Titanic set sail on April 10th. His monthly wage as a fireman or stoker was £6-0-0d; a 'leading fireman' would earn 10/- a month more. He had signed on for the Titanic on 6th April.<br /> <br /> The Inverness Courier for 12th April 1912 reported on Census results, arising out of the 1911 Census, and on the marriage in London of the Marquis of Stafford, son of the Duke and Duchess of Sutherland, at St Peter's, Eaton Square, Belgravia - 'a gathering both large and fashionable'. Sensibly, they elected to spend their honeymoon at Dunrobin Castle and not in North America. <br /> <br /> In the Courier for 16th April they had reached Golspie: 'Rejoicings in the North'. A coal strike had just been settled (causing some disrupted passengers to transfer to the Titanic) and at Tobermory, the salvage steamer Tritan was starting a search for Spanish treasure. Another Irish Home Rule Bill was passing through Parliament and then, on page 5:<br /> <br /> <b>LINER'S PERIL<br /> TITANIC STRIKES AN ICEBERG AND SINKS<br /> 2358 LIVES IN DANGER<br /> A CALL FOR HELP</b><br /> <br /> Early reports were optimistic - the Press Association reported that Mr and Mrs Phillips, of Faracombe, Godalming, had received a telegram from their son: 'Making slowly for Halifax; practically unsinkable; don't worry.' (He did not survive.) The Titanic had left Southampton on its maiden voyage on the previous Wednesday, April 10th. Built at Harland & Wolff, Belfast, it weighed 46,382 tons and cost over £1 million to build. The ship struck an iceberg half way through its journey to New York, late on the night of 14th April and sank early on the morning of the 15th, in less than three hours. Initial figures for passengers and crew were as follows:<br /> <br /> First Class 350<br /> Second Class 305<br /> Third Class 800<br /> Crew 903<br /> Total 2358<br /> <br /> At the very end of this first report the Reuter's news agency is quoted as saying that 'many lives were lost'.<br /> <br /> The actual figures for passenger and crew were slightly different:<br /> <br /> First Class 325<br /> Second Class 285<br /> Third Class 706<br /> Crew 908<br /> Total 2224<br /> <br /> On the maiden voyage the ship was well under capacity, with 1316 passengers on board compared to a possible 2566. There were numerous examples of people joining the Titanic at the last minute, or changing their plans and travelling on other ships, so it was some time before agreed figures emerged, and even then it was admitted that total accuracy could not be guaranteed. The best estimates are that 710 survived and 1514 perished, of which 696 were crew.<br /> <br /> <br /> The photograph shows the Titanic leaving Belfast on her sea trials. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.