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TITLE
Highland Connections with the Titanic, part 2 of 3
EXTERNAL ID
RMS_TITANIC_02
DATE OF IMAGE
1912
PERIOD
1910s
ASSET ID
39002
KEYWORDS
ships
disasters
Highland Connections with the Titanic, part 2 of 3

By Friday April 19th the full extent of the disaster was apparent, with the Courier printing a poignant Editorial: 'In presence of an overwhelming disaster touching all ranks and many lands, humanity is made to feel its frailty'. In the news columns there were reports from the Carpathia, the first rescue ship on the scene. There were messages of sympathy from the King and Queen, from the Kaiser, from the President of France, and a national relief fund was launched.

The Highland News, on 20th April, also had extensive coverage and identified local casualties:

INVERNESS AND NORTHERN MEN ABOARD
The crew of the Titanic included Mr J. Fraser (30), of Inverness, who was employed as a greaser; Mr D. Matheson (30), A. B.; Mr J. M. Smith, Elgin (35), junior fourth engineer; and Mr H. Begrie, Dunrobin, Sutherlandshire, bedroom steward.

They were also able to advise their readers that all letters for Canada and the United States posted at Inverness General Post Office between Saturday 6th April and Wednesday 10th April would probably have travelled on the Titanic and should be presumed lost.

David Matheson, aged 30, was a native of Thurso, in Caithness; he was an Able Seaman, part of the deck crew. He was unmarried and had an address in Southampton; his body was recovered and was buried at Fairview Lawn Cemetery, Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 8th May 1912; in the crew lists, and on his grave, his surname is given as 'Matherson'.

H. Begrie is a bit of a mystery; nobody of that name appears on the crew lists. However, they do contain Norman Leslie Bogie, birthplace Dunrobin - and he appears in the 1891 Census in Rothesay under that name, married with one child, occupation Steward in the Civil Service, with his place of birth given as Golspie, which is, of course, where Dunrobin, the ancestral home of the Dukes of Sutherland, is located. On the Titanic crew list he gives his age as 46, but in fact he was 57 years old. He and his wife Jessie Matheson were both born in Golspie and both were Gaelic speakers. In the telegraphic chaos surrounding the disaster it is easy to see how errors crept into newspaper reports. Norman Leslie Bogie was a Second Class Bedroom Steward on the Titanic; his body was recovered and was buried in a marked grave at Fairview Lawn Cemetery, Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 8th May 1912.


The photograph shows the Titanic at Southampton Docks, prior to departure. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.

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Highland Connections with the Titanic, part 2 of 3

1910s

ships; disasters

Highland Connections with the Titanic

By Friday April 19th the full extent of the disaster was apparent, with the Courier printing a poignant Editorial: <i>'In presence of an overwhelming disaster touching all ranks and many lands, humanity is made to feel its frailty'</i>. In the news columns there were reports from the Carpathia, the first rescue ship on the scene. There were messages of sympathy from the King and Queen, from the Kaiser, from the President of France, and a national relief fund was launched.<br /> <br /> The Highland News, on 20th April, also had extensive coverage and identified local casualties:<br /> <br /> <b>INVERNESS AND NORTHERN MEN ABOARD</b><br /> <i>The crew of the Titanic included Mr J. Fraser (30), of Inverness, who was employed as a greaser; Mr D. Matheson (30), A. B.; Mr J. M. Smith, Elgin (35), junior fourth engineer; and Mr H. Begrie, Dunrobin, Sutherlandshire, bedroom steward.</i><br /> <br /> They were also able to advise their readers that all letters for Canada and the United States posted at Inverness General Post Office between Saturday 6th April and Wednesday 10th April would probably have travelled on the Titanic and should be presumed lost.<br /> <br /> David Matheson, aged 30, was a native of Thurso, in Caithness; he was an Able Seaman, part of the deck crew. He was unmarried and had an address in Southampton; his body was recovered and was buried at Fairview Lawn Cemetery, Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 8th May 1912; in the crew lists, and on his grave, his surname is given as 'Matherson'.<br /> <br /> H. Begrie is a bit of a mystery; nobody of that name appears on the crew lists. However, they do contain Norman Leslie Bogie, birthplace Dunrobin - and he appears in the 1891 Census in Rothesay under that name, married with one child, occupation Steward in the Civil Service, with his place of birth given as Golspie, which is, of course, where Dunrobin, the ancestral home of the Dukes of Sutherland, is located. On the Titanic crew list he gives his age as 46, but in fact he was 57 years old. He and his wife Jessie Matheson were both born in Golspie and both were Gaelic speakers. In the telegraphic chaos surrounding the disaster it is easy to see how errors crept into newspaper reports. Norman Leslie Bogie was a Second Class Bedroom Steward on the Titanic; his body was recovered and was buried in a marked grave at Fairview Lawn Cemetery, Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 8th May 1912.<br /> <br /> <br /> The photograph shows the Titanic at Southampton Docks, prior to departure. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.