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TITLE
Fortrose from Hill of Fortrose
EXTERNAL ID
ROMGH_00_173
PLACENAME
Fortrose
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
SOURCE
Groam House Museum
ASSET ID
39079
KEYWORDS
villages
houses
Fortrose from Hill of Fortrose

The town of Fortrose is situated on the south coast of the Black Isle overlooking the Moray Firth. On the right of the photograph are the ruins of Fortrose Cathedral, built in the 13th century when the Bishop of Ross moved there from Rosemarkie. Fortrose grew up round its Cathedral and was originally known as Chanonry, the Place of the Canons, because the canons of the cathedral lived in manses around the church.

By 1584 Fortrose had a grammar school and the town flourished as a centre of the arts and sciences, especially law and divinity. However, by the time of the Reformation the Cathedral was already in a state of disrepair and tradition has it that much of its red sandstone was later removed by Oliver Cromwell to build his fort in Inverness. The rest was taken by local villagers for their houses.

Fortrose received Royal Burgh status in 1590, but the settlement does not to appear to have prospered greatly as a result. John Gifford, in his book 'The Buildings of Scotland: Highlands and Islands' quotes from a Town Council report of 1691 which stated that Fortrose was just 'a little village'.

However, the town remained a seat of learning. Fortrose Academy was established in 1791, with classes held in the Chapter House and Seaforth House, and was renowned for its education. It moved to its present site in Academy Street in 1891.

Access to the town was improved when the sandstone harbour, designed by Thomas Telford, was constructed between 1813 and 1817. In February 1894, a branch line of the Highland Railway was opened to Fortrose, aiding the settlement's development as a tourist resort. The station was closed to passengers in 1951 but the opening of the Kessock Bridge in 1982 has brought Fortrose within easy reach of Inverness and the rest of the Highlands.

Fortrose remains popular with tourists and holidaymakers. The harbour is home to the Chanonry Sailing Club and the town has an excellent golf course. Chanonry Point is a favourite place to watch bottlenose dolphins.


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Fortrose from Hill of Fortrose

ROSS: Rosemarkie

villages; houses

Groam House Museum

Groam House Museum Photographic Collection

The town of Fortrose is situated on the south coast of the Black Isle overlooking the Moray Firth. On the right of the photograph are the ruins of Fortrose Cathedral, built in the 13th century when the Bishop of Ross moved there from Rosemarkie. Fortrose grew up round its Cathedral and was originally known as Chanonry, the Place of the Canons, because the canons of the cathedral lived in manses around the church. <br /> <br /> By 1584 Fortrose had a grammar school and the town flourished as a centre of the arts and sciences, especially law and divinity. However, by the time of the Reformation the Cathedral was already in a state of disrepair and tradition has it that much of its red sandstone was later removed by Oliver Cromwell to build his fort in Inverness. The rest was taken by local villagers for their houses.<br /> <br /> Fortrose received Royal Burgh status in 1590, but the settlement does not to appear to have prospered greatly as a result. John Gifford, in his book 'The Buildings of Scotland: Highlands and Islands' quotes from a Town Council report of 1691 which stated that Fortrose was just 'a little village'.<br /> <br /> However, the town remained a seat of learning. Fortrose Academy was established in 1791, with classes held in the Chapter House and Seaforth House, and was renowned for its education. It moved to its present site in Academy Street in 1891.<br /> <br /> Access to the town was improved when the sandstone harbour, designed by Thomas Telford, was constructed between 1813 and 1817. In February 1894, a branch line of the Highland Railway was opened to Fortrose, aiding the settlement's development as a tourist resort. The station was closed to passengers in 1951 but the opening of the Kessock Bridge in 1982 has brought Fortrose within easy reach of Inverness and the rest of the Highlands. <br /> <br /> Fortrose remains popular with tourists and holidaymakers. The harbour is home to the Chanonry Sailing Club and the town has an excellent golf course. Chanonry Point is a favourite place to watch bottlenose dolphins. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email <a href="mailto: admin@groamhouse.org.uk">Groam House Museum</a>