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TITLE
Avoch Harbour from the South West
EXTERNAL ID
ROMGH_PA_94_005
PLACENAME
Avoch
DISTRICT
Avoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Avoch
SOURCE
Groam House Museum
ASSET ID
39098
KEYWORDS
fishing
boats
fishing industry
Avoch Harbour from the South West

Fishing boats lie berthed in Avoch harbour in this undated photograph.

Avoch (pronounced A'ach) was, along with Cromarty, an important fishing village in the Black Isle. Traditionally, Avoch fishermen would spend the winter fishing for herring in local waters, and in the summer would take their boats to Caithness and Loch Broom. With the introduction in the late 1800s of larger fishing boats, known as Zulus, Avoch fishermen began to journey further afield in the summer months, both to more northerly areas like Shetland and also to English waters.

Women played an important part in the fishing industry in places like Avoch. The wives of fishermen would take some of the catch to sell locally. Traditionally, fish would be bartered in exchange for other goods, but latterly were sold for cash. Unmarried women would work as fish gutters and packers, and in the summer would travel to other fishing ports in Scotland, Ireland and England to work.

By the late 1920s there were still around 200 fishermen in Avoch, but the industry has since declined. Today there is a small fishing fleet in Avoch, catching mainly prawns, white fish and clams.

Avoch harbour was designed by Thomas Telford and built in 1814. The building of the harbour was funded by the explorer and fur trader Sir Alexander MacKenzie. Originally from the Isle of Lewis, MacKenzie inherited the Avoch estate through marriage in 1812. He divided his time between Avoch and London, until his death in 1820. He is buried in Avoch churchyard.


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Avoch Harbour from the South West

ROSS: Avoch

fishing; boats; fishing industry;

Groam House Museum

Groam House Museum Photographic Collection

Fishing boats lie berthed in Avoch harbour in this undated photograph. <br /> <br /> Avoch (pronounced A'ach) was, along with Cromarty, an important fishing village in the Black Isle. Traditionally, Avoch fishermen would spend the winter fishing for herring in local waters, and in the summer would take their boats to Caithness and Loch Broom. With the introduction in the late 1800s of larger fishing boats, known as Zulus, Avoch fishermen began to journey further afield in the summer months, both to more northerly areas like Shetland and also to English waters. <br /> <br /> Women played an important part in the fishing industry in places like Avoch. The wives of fishermen would take some of the catch to sell locally. Traditionally, fish would be bartered in exchange for other goods, but latterly were sold for cash. Unmarried women would work as fish gutters and packers, and in the summer would travel to other fishing ports in Scotland, Ireland and England to work.<br /> <br /> By the late 1920s there were still around 200 fishermen in Avoch, but the industry has since declined. Today there is a small fishing fleet in Avoch, catching mainly prawns, white fish and clams.<br /> <br /> Avoch harbour was designed by Thomas Telford and built in 1814. The building of the harbour was funded by the explorer and fur trader Sir Alexander MacKenzie. Originally from the Isle of Lewis, MacKenzie inherited the Avoch estate through marriage in 1812. He divided his time between Avoch and London, until his death in 1820. He is buried in Avoch churchyard. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email <a href="mailto: admin@groamhouse.org.uk">Groam House Museum</a>