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TITLE
Rosemarkie from Craig, about 1960
EXTERNAL ID
ROMGH_PA_94_214
PLACENAME
Rosemarkie
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
DATE OF IMAGE
1960
PERIOD
1960s
SOURCE
Groam House Museum
ASSET ID
39262
KEYWORDS
villages
houses
Rosemarkie from Craig, about 1960

This view of Rosemarkie was taken from the Craig. Just above the beach is Rosemarkie Parish Church, built between 1818 and 1821. There is evidence that a Christian settlement existed on or near this site as early as the 7th century and was then taken over in the 8th century by St Boniface, also known as St Curadan. Later, in the 12th century, the first Cathedral of the Diocese of Ross was erected on the same site.

Rosemarkie, whose name means 'point of the horse burn', is a village on the south coast of the Black Isle. The bay sweeps round the peninsula of Chanonry Ness, covered by a golf course, to Chanonry Point where a narrow stretch of water separates the Black Isle from the Moray Coast. The lighthouse here is the best place to watch the bottle-nose dolphins which live in the Moray Firth and delight onlookers with their acrobatics.

The village of Rosemarkie is joined with its neighbour Fortrose, but claims to be the more ancient of the two. There is evidence that a Pictish settlement once existed at Rosemarkie during the 8th century. More than 12 Pictish stones were found around the village churchyard and are now housed at the Groam House Museum in the village.

Rosemarkie was granted burgh status in the early 13th century and shared Royal Burgh status with Fortrose from 1455. As with many small communities, Rosemarkie was self-sufficient in the days before improved communications. Flax was grown and linen made. Remains of the "pows" or ponds where the flax was steeped can still be seen in the Fairy Glen. Other industries included boat building and salmon fishing.

Today the village has much to offer tourists, including the Groam House Museum, wooded walks leading to waterfalls through the Fairy Glen and a beautiful secluded beach. The opening of the Kessock Bridge in 1982 has given easy access for day trippers from Inverness to this pretty, tranquil spot.


This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email Groam House Museum

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Rosemarkie from Craig, about 1960

ROSS: Rosemarkie

1960s

villages; houses

Groam House Museum

Groam House Museum Photographic Collection

This view of Rosemarkie was taken from the Craig. Just above the beach is Rosemarkie Parish Church, built between 1818 and 1821. There is evidence that a Christian settlement existed on or near this site as early as the 7th century and was then taken over in the 8th century by St Boniface, also known as St Curadan. Later, in the 12th century, the first Cathedral of the Diocese of Ross was erected on the same site. <br /> <br /> Rosemarkie, whose name means 'point of the horse burn', is a village on the south coast of the Black Isle. The bay sweeps round the peninsula of Chanonry Ness, covered by a golf course, to Chanonry Point where a narrow stretch of water separates the Black Isle from the Moray Coast. The lighthouse here is the best place to watch the bottle-nose dolphins which live in the Moray Firth and delight onlookers with their acrobatics. <br /> <br /> The village of Rosemarkie is joined with its neighbour Fortrose, but claims to be the more ancient of the two. There is evidence that a Pictish settlement once existed at Rosemarkie during the 8th century. More than 12 Pictish stones were found around the village churchyard and are now housed at the Groam House Museum in the village. <br /> <br /> Rosemarkie was granted burgh status in the early 13th century and shared Royal Burgh status with Fortrose from 1455. As with many small communities, Rosemarkie was self-sufficient in the days before improved communications. Flax was grown and linen made. Remains of the "pows" or ponds where the flax was steeped can still be seen in the Fairy Glen. Other industries included boat building and salmon fishing.<br /> <br /> Today the village has much to offer tourists, including the Groam House Museum, wooded walks leading to waterfalls through the Fairy Glen and a beautiful secluded beach. The opening of the Kessock Bridge in 1982 has given easy access for day trippers from Inverness to this pretty, tranquil spot. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase. For further information about purchasing and prices please email <a href="mailto: admin@groamhouse.org.uk">Groam House Museum</a>