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TITLE
Waterwheel at Glendale Mill, Isle of Skye
EXTERNAL ID
SLD_182_052
PLACENAME
Glendale
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Duirinish
PERIOD
1970s; 1980s
CREATOR
Olivia James
SOURCE
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre
ASSET ID
39497
KEYWORDS
corn mills
water mills
Glendale watermill
Glendale Mill
occupations
grain mill
Waterwheel at Glendale Mill, Isle of Skye

The sun catches the droplets of water cascading from the waterwheel at Glendale Mill. The narrow wheel was made by Thomas Main of Edinburgh and installed around 1902, replacing a wooden one. The water-powered corn mill at Glendale is located on the southern shore of Loch Pooltiel in the west of Skye, close to the mouth of the Hamara River. A rare survivor from the mid-18th century, the mill took water from a small burn to turn an iron overshot wheel on the south gable on the left of the building. Alongside the mill is a kiln house where the grain was dried prior grinding. The mill was probably built by the local landowner to grind cereals grown in the area. People were prevented from owning their own querns or millstones thus ensuring all flour and ground oats had to come from the landowner's mill. The small scale of the mill reflects the limited amount of arable land in the vicinity although grain may also have been brought from elsewhere by boat.

The mill originally had a thatched roof but was slated around 1914. However, it was redundant by the end of World War I. The photograph shows the building after a comprehensive restoration in 1972. This included a straw thatch and reproduction milling machinery with a pair of stones from Rogart Mill in Sutherland. The restored building, leased from the Glendale Estate, was a popular visitor attraction for a time but its condition deteriorated considerably and the thatched roof finally collapsed in 2009. Recently, the buildings have been reroofed and the Estate is raising funds for another full restoration.


Olivia James
The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre.
'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan.


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Skye and Lochalsh Archives

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Waterwheel at Glendale Mill, Isle of Skye

INVERNESS: Duirinish

1970s; 1980s

corn mills; water mills; Glendale watermill; Glendale Mill; occupations; grain mill

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

Olivia James Collection

The sun catches the droplets of water cascading from the waterwheel at Glendale Mill. The narrow wheel was made by Thomas Main of Edinburgh and installed around 1902, replacing a wooden one. The water-powered corn mill at Glendale is located on the southern shore of Loch Pooltiel in the west of Skye, close to the mouth of the Hamara River. A rare survivor from the mid-18th century, the mill took water from a small burn to turn an iron overshot wheel on the south gable on the left of the building. Alongside the mill is a kiln house where the grain was dried prior grinding. The mill was probably built by the local landowner to grind cereals grown in the area. People were prevented from owning their own querns or millstones thus ensuring all flour and ground oats had to come from the landowner's mill. The small scale of the mill reflects the limited amount of arable land in the vicinity although grain may also have been brought from elsewhere by boat.<br /> <br /> The mill originally had a thatched roof but was slated around 1914. However, it was redundant by the end of World War I. The photograph shows the building after a comprehensive restoration in 1972. This included a straw thatch and reproduction milling machinery with a pair of stones from Rogart Mill in Sutherland. The restored building, leased from the Glendale Estate, was a popular visitor attraction for a time but its condition deteriorated considerably and the thatched roof finally collapsed in 2009. Recently, the buildings have been reroofed and the Estate is raising funds for another full restoration.<br /> <br /> <br /> <b>Olivia James</b><br /> The images in this collection are a selection from a set of high quality Agfachrome slides taken by Olivia James. Mrs James, a semi-professional photographer, took the photographs on visits to Skye between 1968 and 1989, using a Pentax S1A camera and CT 18 film. They record a variety of locations, people and activities which have now changed or indeed disappeared, and provide one person's view of the island through the camera lens. Born in Elderslie, Renfrewshire on 26th April 1932, Olive Grace James (née Purcell) moved to England in 1944, trained as a teacher and married Richard James in 1956. Her husband's forbears were from Skye and they began visiting on a regular basis in 1968. In addition to the slides, Mrs James has written an evocative account of her memories of places, events and people on Skye which she named 'Skye Magic', a copy of which is held at the Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre.<br /> 'Skye Magic' has been incorporated into her privately printed autobiography 'Neivie, Neivie, Nick, Nack' which she has kindly donated to various institutions including the Clan Donald Library on Skye, the Mitchell Library in Glasgow and the Weaver's Cottage, Kilbarchan. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: skyeandlochalsh.archives@highlifehighland.com ">Skye and Lochalsh Archives</a>