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TITLE
'Telford' or 'Parliamentary' Church, Ullapool
EXTERNAL ID
ULLAPOOL_0021
PLACENAME
Ullapool
DISTRICT
Lochbroom
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochbroom
DATE OF IMAGE
May 2003
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Janine Donald
SOURCE
Janine Donald
ASSET ID
39993
KEYWORDS
churches
museums
'Telford' or 'Parliamentary' Church, Ullapool

This Grade A listed building on West Argyle Street, originally erected in 1829, now houses Ullapool Museum. Thomas Telford was the chief engineer involved in the design of the building and it is one of 32 similar churches throughout the Highlands. Also known as 'Parliamentary Churches' these places of worship were erected after a Highlands and Islands Commission decided that additional churches were needed in thinly-populated and scattered parishes.

Each church (plus manse) was to cost no more than £1500 which kept the design simple, if perhaps austere. The original plan was for 43 churches but by the end of the program in 1830 only 32 were completed with 11 existing churches being renovated.

The last service held in this Church of Scotland parish church was in 1935. It has been used as a museum since 1990 and has been restored to the colour and décor of the original building.

The museum houses local archives, records, photos and a genealogy section. It also has a large screen audio-visual presentation of Loch Broom

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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'Telford' or 'Parliamentary' Church, Ullapool

ROSS: Lochbroom

2000s

churches; museums

Janine Donald

This Grade A listed building on West Argyle Street, originally erected in 1829, now houses Ullapool Museum. Thomas Telford was the chief engineer involved in the design of the building and it is one of 32 similar churches throughout the Highlands. Also known as 'Parliamentary Churches' these places of worship were erected after a Highlands and Islands Commission decided that additional churches were needed in thinly-populated and scattered parishes.<br /> <br /> Each church (plus manse) was to cost no more than £1500 which kept the design simple, if perhaps austere. The original plan was for 43 churches but by the end of the program in 1830 only 32 were completed with 11 existing churches being renovated.<br /> <br /> The last service held in this Church of Scotland parish church was in 1935. It has been used as a museum since 1990 and has been restored to the colour and décor of the original building. <br /> <br /> The museum houses local archives, records, photos and a genealogy section. It also has a large screen audio-visual presentation of Loch Broom