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William Inglis

This portrait of William Inglis hangs in the Main Hall of Inverness Town House. The artist is unknown.

William Inglis (1747-1801) was a merchant and banker in Inverness. He bought the small estate of Kingsmills. The original house is now incorporated in the Kingsmills Hotel.

Inglis entered the Town Council at an early age. In 1780 he was made a Baillie and in 1791, as Dean of Guild, he was responsible for raising funds to build a new jail, court house and steeple. Only the steeple now remains. He was also the driving force behind the establishment of Inverness Royal Academy and the Northern Infirmary.

In 1797 Inglis was elected provost, a post he held until 1800. Provost Inglis is particularly remembered for having entertained Robert Burns to supper at his home in September 1778.

Under Provost Inglis' administration many of the buildings in Inverness, which had fallen into ruin since the Jacobite Rebellion, were repaired or rebuilt. In 1800 he persuaded the Council to build a retaining wall at the foot of the castle. Inglis Street is named after him.

William Inglis died on 14th February 1801.

William Inglis' half-brother was Alexander Inglis. One of Alexander's daughters married Dr James Robertson of Aultnaskiach, who was also a provost of Inverness.

Alexander's granddaughter was Dr Elsie Inglis, one of Edinburgh's best known medical women. She specialised in the care of women and children but also set up the Scottish Women's Hospital which sent hospital units to France, Greece and Serbia during World War I.

Another member of the family, Dr John Inglis Nicol, served as provost from 1840 to 1843.

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William Inglis

1790s;1800;

Inverness Town House; provosts; portraits; Kingsmills; Town Council; baillies; deans; Inverness Steeple; Inverness Royal Academy; Northern Infirmary; Robert Burns; Alexander Inglis; James Robertson; Dr Elsie Inglis; Scottish Women's Hospital

Am Baile

Inverness Town House 2007

This portrait of William Inglis hangs in the Main Hall of Inverness Town House. The artist is unknown.<br /> <br /> William Inglis (1747-1801) was a merchant and banker in Inverness. He bought the small estate of Kingsmills. The original house is now incorporated in the Kingsmills Hotel.<br /> <br /> Inglis entered the Town Council at an early age. In 1780 he was made a Baillie and in 1791, as Dean of Guild, he was responsible for raising funds to build a new jail, court house and steeple. Only the steeple now remains. He was also the driving force behind the establishment of Inverness Royal Academy and the Northern Infirmary.<br /> <br /> In 1797 Inglis was elected provost, a post he held until 1800. Provost Inglis is particularly remembered for having entertained Robert Burns to supper at his home in September 1778.<br /> <br /> Under Provost Inglis' administration many of the buildings in Inverness, which had fallen into ruin since the Jacobite Rebellion, were repaired or rebuilt. In 1800 he persuaded the Council to build a retaining wall at the foot of the castle. Inglis Street is named after him.<br /> <br /> William Inglis died on 14th February 1801.<br /> <br /> William Inglis' half-brother was Alexander Inglis. One of Alexander's daughters married Dr James Robertson of Aultnaskiach, who was also a provost of Inverness. <br /> <br /> Alexander's granddaughter was Dr Elsie Inglis, one of Edinburgh's best known medical women. She specialised in the care of women and children but also set up the Scottish Women's Hospital which sent hospital units to France, Greece and Serbia during World War I.<br /> <br /> Another member of the family, Dr John Inglis Nicol, served as provost from 1840 to 1843.