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TITLE
Account of the Town and Harbour of Pulteneytown, 1844, page 05
EXTERNAL ID
Z_QZP40_TOWN AND HARBOUR_28648_005
PLACENAME
Wick
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Wick
DATE OF IMAGE
1844
PERIOD
1840s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
40880
KEYWORDS
harbours

The fifth page of a fourteen page document entitled:- Account of Town and Harbour of Pulteneytown from their Origin in the year 1803 to 1844 and description of the casks for floating large stones, to construct sea walls in deep water. Also includes Excerpt Minutes of proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers by James Bremner.

This page contains three illustrations: cross sections of the north pier, the south pier and the new proposed pier.

In 1805, a harbour was built and Pulteneytown laid out for the British Fisheries Society. The society was formed to persuade evicted crofters to take up fishing. The town was planned to a grid design and many of the streets were named after commissioners of the society including Pulteneytown itself, named after Sir William Pulteney.

In 1902, as part of a local government reorganisation, Pulteneytown became part of Wick Royal Burgh

A Royal Burgh from 1589, the town of Wick has even more ancient origins, as shown by its name which comes from the Norse "Vic", the word for bay. It lies on the north east coast of Scotland 30 kilometres south of John O'Groats.

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Account of the Town and Harbour of Pulteneytown, 1844, page 05

CAITHNESS: Wick

1840s

harbours

Highland Libraries

The fifth page of a fourteen page document entitled:- <i>Account of Town and Harbour of Pulteneytown from their Origin in the year 1803 to 1844 and description of the casks for floating large stones, to construct sea walls in deep water</i>. Also includes <i>Excerpt Minutes of proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers</i> by James Bremner.<br /> <br /> This page contains three illustrations: cross sections of the north pier, the south pier and the new proposed pier.<br /> <br /> In 1805, a harbour was built and Pulteneytown laid out for the British Fisheries Society. The society was formed to persuade evicted crofters to take up fishing. The town was planned to a grid design and many of the streets were named after commissioners of the society including Pulteneytown itself, named after Sir William Pulteney.<br /> <br /> In 1902, as part of a local government reorganisation, Pulteneytown became part of Wick Royal Burgh<br /> <br /> A Royal Burgh from 1589, the town of Wick has even more ancient origins, as shown by its name which comes from the Norse "Vic", the word for bay. It lies on the north east coast of Scotland 30 kilometres south of John O'Groats.