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TITLE
Colin MacDonald's Croft House, Heights of Inchvannie, Strathpeffer
EXTERNAL ID
AB_MARGARET_NEWTON
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Margaret Newton
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
40985
KEYWORDS
audios
crofting
crofters
crofter
croft
crofts

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This audio extract is from an interview with Margaret MacDonald Newton, daughter of Colin MacDonald, author of various accounts of life in the Highlands including 'Echoes of the Glen' (1936), 'Highland Journey' (1949), 'Croft and Ceilidh' (1947), 'Highland Memories' (1949), and 'Crofts and Crofters' (1955).

Interviewer: Was this your father's home? Here?

Margaret: Well, yes it was.

Interviewer: Yes?

Margaret: But, eh, when he was born it was, it was always this croft but the original house was further west and it, behind the red roofed barn that you may have seen on the way up.

Interviewer: Yeah, yeah.

Margaret: And it was a single storey thatched house. And then in 1883, the Napier Commission began to look into the rights of crofters because the landlords were tending to turn them out of their crofts and, you know, destroy their way of life really. And the Napier Commission ended up in a Crofters Act of 1886 which amongst other things ensured that the crofters would have security of tenure and fair compensation for improvements that they had made in the land if ever they left it, the landlord would have to pay them for the improvements he had made, they had made. And that was a great thing so that about 1886 a great many of the crofters began to build better houses and this barn was built between 1886 and 1900 I think. 18- no, and 18, it took about four or five years you know, because they were doing most of the building themselves and maybe employing a mason for a day or two and someone else.

But usually the sons of the croft, because only one could inheret it, had to have a trade so a lot of them were joiners, plumbers, you know, all sorts of things, so they could do a lot for themselves and that's when this house was built. It was always of a pattern; there was the front door, a porch, front door, the east room, which was the room for the minister and visitors, and the west room which was a room you lived in, and upstairs, two rooms. Oh there's also a little room behind the two rooms which was traditionally the parents' bedroom. And then upstairs one, one side was the boys and the other side was the girls and there was also a little room between the two rooms upstairs with a skylight which was just a sort of dumping ground, or it could put a spare bed in if it was necessary.

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Colin MacDonald's Croft House, Heights of Inchvannie, Strathpeffer

2000s

audios; crofting; crofters; crofter; croft; crofts;

Am Baile

This audio extract is from an interview with Margaret MacDonald Newton, daughter of Colin MacDonald, author of various accounts of life in the Highlands including 'Echoes of the Glen' (1936), 'Highland Journey' (1949), 'Croft and Ceilidh' (1947), 'Highland Memories' (1949), and 'Crofts and Crofters' (1955). <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was this your father's home? Here? <br /> <br /> Margaret: Well, yes it was. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes? <br /> <br /> Margaret: But, eh, when he was born it was, it was always this croft but the original house was further west and it, behind the red roofed barn that you may have seen on the way up. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yeah, yeah. <br /> <br /> Margaret: And it was a single storey thatched house. And then in 1883, the Napier Commission began to look into the rights of crofters because the landlords were tending to turn them out of their crofts and, you know, destroy their way of life really. And the Napier Commission ended up in a Crofters Act of 1886 which amongst other things ensured that the crofters would have security of tenure and fair compensation for improvements that they had made in the land if ever they left it, the landlord would have to pay them for the improvements he had made, they had made. And that was a great thing so that about 1886 a great many of the crofters began to build better houses and this barn was built between 1886 and 1900 I think. 18- no, and 18, it took about four or five years you know, because they were doing most of the building themselves and maybe employing a mason for a day or two and someone else. <br /> <br /> But usually the sons of the croft, because only one could inheret it, had to have a trade so a lot of them were joiners, plumbers, you know, all sorts of things, so they could do a lot for themselves and that's when this house was built. It was always of a pattern; there was the front door, a porch, front door, the east room, which was the room for the minister and visitors, and the west room which was a room you lived in, and upstairs, two rooms. Oh there's also a little room behind the two rooms which was traditionally the parents' bedroom. And then upstairs one, one side was the boys and the other side was the girls and there was also a little room between the two rooms upstairs with a skylight which was just a sort of dumping ground, or it could put a spare bed in if it was necessary.