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TITLE
Italian Prisoners of War at Brucefield Farm, Portmahomack (1 of 2)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_ROSEMARY_MACKAY_08
PLACENAME
Portmahomack
DISTRICT
Fearn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Tarbat
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Rosemary Mackay
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
40999
KEYWORDS
prisoners of war
Second World War
World War Two
wars
audios

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In this audio extract Rosemary Mackay of Fearn remembers the Italian prisoners of war who worked at Brucefield Farm, Portmahomack, during the war.

'We had Italian prisoners next door to us at Brucefield. I can assure you none o them wanted to escape. They knew they were on to a good thing, they'd stay prisoners. I can remember when they capitulated an they came home cheering. 'We're all friends now!' Sheila had been home for the night from Tain because Cookie dished up a special meal. Cookie came to the door an said they were having this meal, an they were celebrating. Just through the wall from us. An, but Cookie came with his white apron an Ah remember, a white towel over his arm, but he came with a tray of four plates of - it was spaghetti! An that's another thing Ah remember, but he made it. He made the - an he dried it off over the clothes rope. He wiped it all clean an he puts the strips of dough over the clothes rope. We used to laugh about him putting the washing out on the clothes rope. It was the - well, spaghetti, pasta, or some- that he was making. That was the only way they got it. But he did it in, that night, in the colors of the Italian flag. An it was tomatoes, an the spaghetti, and he had parsley; he grew a lot o herbs in the garden, an he - Well it might not have been parsley; parsley was the usual one we use, but it could have been herbs o any kind that he had. He said that was the colour of the Italian flag. An that stuck wi me. If there's a quiz I always say, 'Aye, that's the colour o the Italian flag.' Or that was the colour at that time. But Sheila went into the festivities next door, an she had her meal with them. So, I can assure you none o them wanted to escape.'

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Italian Prisoners of War at Brucefield Farm, Portmahomack (1 of 2)

ROSS: Tarbat

2000s

prisoners of war; Second World War; World War Two; wars; audios

Am Baile

Am Baile: Portmahomack During the War

In this audio extract Rosemary Mackay of Fearn remembers the Italian prisoners of war who worked at Brucefield Farm, Portmahomack, during the war.<br /> <br /> 'We had Italian prisoners next door to us at Brucefield. I can assure you none o them wanted to escape. They knew they were on to a good thing, they'd stay prisoners. I can remember when they capitulated an they came home cheering. 'We're all friends now!' Sheila had been home for the night from Tain because Cookie dished up a special meal. Cookie came to the door an said they were having this meal, an they were celebrating. Just through the wall from us. An, but Cookie came with his white apron an Ah remember, a white towel over his arm, but he came with a tray of four plates of - it was spaghetti! An that's another thing Ah remember, but he made it. He made the - an he dried it off over the clothes rope. He wiped it all clean an he puts the strips of dough over the clothes rope. We used to laugh about him putting the washing out on the clothes rope. It was the - well, spaghetti, pasta, or some- that he was making. That was the only way they got it. But he did it in, that night, in the colors of the Italian flag. An it was tomatoes, an the spaghetti, and he had parsley; he grew a lot o herbs in the garden, an he - Well it might not have been parsley; parsley was the usual one we use, but it could have been herbs o any kind that he had. He said that was the colour of the Italian flag. An that stuck wi me. If there's a quiz I always say, 'Aye, that's the colour o the Italian flag.' Or that was the colour at that time. But Sheila went into the festivities next door, an she had her meal with them. So, I can assure you none o them wanted to escape.'