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TITLE
Italian Prisoners of War at Brucefield Farm, Portmahomack (2 of 2)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_ROSEMARY_MACKAY_09
PLACENAME
Portmahomack
DISTRICT
Fearn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Tarbat
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Rosemary Mackay
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
41000
KEYWORDS
prisoners of war
Second World War
World War Two
wars
audios

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In this audio extract Rosemary Mackay of Fearn remembers the Italian prisoners of war who worked at Brucefield Farm, Portmahomack, during the war.

'There were very nice to us, the Italians. An there was one - an older man - because they were all in - about twenty years old. Twenty-one. Well, ages with our brother. Young men. But there was one was slightly older an Ah think he was about twenty-eight. An, Ah can remember that so well; he had dark eyes an dark, darker skin an that, but he was from Sicily. An when the British landed in Sicily - He was married. He was the only married prisoner. Josephine was the name of his wife. I can remember that in detail. An he would take the photograph, the only photograph he had of the baby, an the wife was - taken in a phtographer's - an she had, his son, the baby, a few months old, sitting on her knee. And when we invaded in Sicily, there was another prisoner, like, Italian, he had fair hair an blue eyes, which was unusual. Ah can't remember his name but Ah can still picture him, an he stopped ma father coming in from work an he said, he said to Dad, 'See, his wife Josephine now has a Tommie! Has a Tommie!' An Ah remember Dad shaking his head but smiling at the one that was winding Joseppe up. He was Joseppe, the father o the baby. An he would take the picture out o the pocket book an, maself an ma twin, we would run to see this photo o a lovely dark-eyed baby. An he would stroke it gently with his finger - the baby - an he would say, 'Josephina, no. No Tommie.' He was explaining to us - though we were only ten year old - that his Josephina wouldn't go wi a Tommie. It was cruel in the fact, but they were young lads; they werna thinking the hurt they were causing their mate, by sayin, 'She'll be off with a Tommie.'

An then when the Americans made a landing, oh Ah can remember the same fair-haired Tally saying to Dad, 'Nylons, George! Nylons! Josephine forget. Forget.' She would forget. Josephine would forget all about him cos nylons would be the draw with the Americans. An d'ye know, Joseppe was nearly in tears over it. He must have been very frustrated about the winding up he was getting. But ma mother said afterwards, he wouldn't leave. When they came to - when they were repatriated - came to bid us goodbye - Joseppe said, what he most wanted was a photograph of maself an ma twin to let Josephine see when he went home. We had always been kind. We never wound - we didn't know that he was being wound up!

Interviewer: No, no.

An we always wanted to see this photograph o the baby an he would stroke it gently with his finger.

Interviewer: Oh, that's sad. Yes.'

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Italian Prisoners of War at Brucefield Farm, Portmahomack (2 of 2)

ROSS: Tarbat

2000s

prisoners of war; Second World War; World War Two; wars; audios

Am Baile

Am Baile: Portmahomack During the War

In this audio extract Rosemary Mackay of Fearn remembers the Italian prisoners of war who worked at Brucefield Farm, Portmahomack, during the war. <br /> <br /> 'There were very nice to us, the Italians. An there was one - an older man - because they were all in - about twenty years old. Twenty-one. Well, ages with our brother. Young men. But there was one was slightly older an Ah think he was about twenty-eight. An, Ah can remember that so well; he had dark eyes an dark, darker skin an that, but he was from Sicily. An when the British landed in Sicily - He was married. He was the only married prisoner. Josephine was the name of his wife. I can remember that in detail. An he would take the photograph, the only photograph he had of the baby, an the wife was - taken in a phtographer's - an she had, his son, the baby, a few months old, sitting on her knee. And when we invaded in Sicily, there was another prisoner, like, Italian, he had fair hair an blue eyes, which was unusual. Ah can't remember his name but Ah can still picture him, an he stopped ma father coming in from work an he said, he said to Dad, 'See, his wife Josephine now has a Tommie! Has a Tommie!' An Ah remember Dad shaking his head but smiling at the one that was winding Joseppe up. He was Joseppe, the father o the baby. An he would take the picture out o the pocket book an, maself an ma twin, we would run to see this photo o a lovely dark-eyed baby. An he would stroke it gently with his finger - the baby - an he would say, 'Josephina, no. No Tommie.' He was explaining to us - though we were only ten year old - that his Josephina wouldn't go wi a Tommie. It was cruel in the fact, but they were young lads; they werna thinking the hurt they were causing their mate, by sayin, 'She'll be off with a Tommie.'<br /> <br /> An then when the Americans made a landing, oh Ah can remember the same fair-haired Tally saying to Dad, 'Nylons, George! Nylons! Josephine forget. Forget.' She would forget. Josephine would forget all about him cos nylons would be the draw with the Americans. An d'ye know, Joseppe was nearly in tears over it. He must have been very frustrated about the winding up he was getting. But ma mother said afterwards, he wouldn't leave. When they came to - when they were repatriated - came to bid us goodbye - Joseppe said, what he most wanted was a photograph of maself an ma twin to let Josephine see when he went home. We had always been kind. We never wound - we didn't know that he was being wound up! <br /> <br /> Interviewer: No, no.<br /> <br /> An we always wanted to see this photograph o the baby an he would stroke it gently with his finger.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh, that's sad. Yes.'