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TITLE
What did you speak about at Scotland's Global Impact? - Rosalind McClean
EXTERNAL ID
AB_SGI_06_ROSALIND_MCCLEAN_Q_03
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Rosalind McClean
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
41045
KEYWORDS
conferences
emigration
lecturers
audio
audios
speakabout

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As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad.

Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Dr Rosalind McClean answers the question:

'Could you give a brief summary of what you spoke about at the conference?'

'I've been interested lately in how people see their own pasts. When I did my PhD I was struck by the fact that most people going to New Zealanders, especially to Otago, were Lowlanders, but they often told Highland stories. They came from the Lowlands, and I've been going back and looking at those stories more closely and finding out where the stories come from, and realising that they're - they often relate to older stories that are partially remembered. And I've been finding narratives in different forms; sometimes they're just on tombstones; sometimes they're something written down by somebody at a Jubilee celebration - fifty years after arrival - and he makes a comment such as, 'Well, I came from the isle of Rothesay but my great grandfather was out for Prince Charlie and then after the bloody Cumberland came along, my grandfather put a bloody haversack on his back and walked down to the Lowlands looking for a job.' And so I'm beginning to find these snippets to find out older histories to see what's survived, and how those have changed. And, so it's seeing how migration stories and people's, people's personal understandings of their past interact; that's my current interest.'


BIOGRAPHY

A graduate of the Universities of Dunedin and Edinburgh, Rosalind McClean is a lecturer at the University of Waikato, New Zealand. In 2004, as a member of a team of New Zealand and Scottish scholars, she received a prestigious Marsden fellowship to study Scottish migration and settlement patterns in Aotearoa New Zealand and to investigate the legacies of this migration. Her academic work is informed by her experiences during the 1990s, when she travelled extensively, living with her young family in various locations in the Middle East, Europe and North America. She has worked for a charitable trust and as a freelance writer, and remains an advocate for migrant and refugee rights.

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What did you speak about at Scotland's Global Impact? - Rosalind McClean

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

conferences; emigration; lecturers; audio; audios; speakabout;

Am Baile

Scotland's Global Impact

As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad. <br /> <br /> Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Dr Rosalind McClean answers the question:<br /> <br /> 'Could you give a brief summary of what you spoke about at the conference?' <br /> <br /> 'I've been interested lately in how people see their own pasts. When I did my PhD I was struck by the fact that most people going to New Zealanders, especially to Otago, were Lowlanders, but they often told Highland stories. They came from the Lowlands, and I've been going back and looking at those stories more closely and finding out where the stories come from, and realising that they're - they often relate to older stories that are partially remembered. And I've been finding narratives in different forms; sometimes they're just on tombstones; sometimes they're something written down by somebody at a Jubilee celebration - fifty years after arrival - and he makes a comment such as, 'Well, I came from the isle of Rothesay but my great grandfather was out for Prince Charlie and then after the bloody Cumberland came along, my grandfather put a bloody haversack on his back and walked down to the Lowlands looking for a job.' And so I'm beginning to find these snippets to find out older histories to see what's survived, and how those have changed. And, so it's seeing how migration stories and people's, people's personal understandings of their past interact; that's my current interest.'<br /> <br /> <br /> BIOGRAPHY<br /> <br /> A graduate of the Universities of Dunedin and Edinburgh, Rosalind McClean is a lecturer at the University of Waikato, New Zealand. In 2004, as a member of a team of New Zealand and Scottish scholars, she received a prestigious Marsden fellowship to study Scottish migration and settlement patterns in Aotearoa New Zealand and to investigate the legacies of this migration. Her academic work is informed by her experiences during the 1990s, when she travelled extensively, living with her young family in various locations in the Middle East, Europe and North America. She has worked for a charitable trust and as a freelance writer, and remains an advocate for migrant and refugee rights.