Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
What fired your interest in your subject? - Andrew Mackillop
EXTERNAL ID
AB_SGI_07_ANDREW_MACKILLOP_Q_02
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Andrew Mackillop
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
41052
KEYWORDS
conferences
emigration
lecturers
audio
audios
subjectinterest

Get Adobe Flash player

As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad.

Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Dr Andrew Mackillop answers the question:

'What fired your interest in your particular area of expertise?'

'As is always the case, I suppose, the, any interest in history really springs from personal family background experience etc., and it came in a kind of a number of different ways. I, my grandfather was in the army and fought during the Great War and I suppose I got interested in military history as a result of my grandfather's experience - I'd seen photographs of him; his old army kilt, etc. It was a very personal family that drew me to towards military history, but not military history in terms of battles fought in, but rather more about how the Highlands' society was shaped by its relationship to the British army through mass involvement of manpower etc., and so I ended up doing research on the impact of the British army's mass use of Highland manpower and how that affected communities. And that led me, in one sense, into my, what was my early work on the military recruiting economy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

But rather less impressive, or professional, I had my first pint in a bar in Harris called the Rodel Hotel and when I had my first legal pint in that bar I remember hearing that the hotel had been built originally by a man called Alexander Macleod of Harris who'd come from, had made his money in India, in the middle of the eighteenth century, and had come back to Harris, and had built this large country house as then, and that became the Rodel Hotel and the pub that I was drinking in. And I thought how on earth did somebody from Harris end up in India, on the other side of the world, and end up coming back? And so my per-, my current area of research and interest is on Scots in India and China and I got to that by drinking in the Rodel Hotel. So it's not exactly-, I should probably emphasise the personal dimension of my grandfather, not my, not my drinking in the pub, But it's, I suppose that, in some sense, gives you that even university lecturers tend to be drawn to history through very personal experiences.'


BIOGRAPHY

Dr Andrew Mackillop is a lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Aberdeen. Publications on Highland history include: 'More Fruitful than the Soil': Army, Empire and the Scottish Highlands, 1715-1815 (East Linton, 2000) and 'The Political Culture of the Scottish Highlands from Culloden to Waterloo', The Historical Journal, 46 (2003). His research interests currently centre upon the differing experiences of the Scots, Irish and Welsh in the Asian hemisphere of British imperialism during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

His most recent publication, 'A Union for Empire? Scotland, the English East India Company and the British Union', Scottish Historical Review, 87 (2008) will be followed at the end of this year by, "A Reticent People?': The Welsh in Asia, 1700-1815', in Huw Bowen (ed.), Wales and the British Empire (Manchester, 2009) and, as co-editor with Micheál O' Siochrú, Forging the State: European State Formation and the Anglo-Scottish Union of 1707 (Dundee, 2009).

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

What fired your interest in your subject? - Andrew Mackillop

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

conferences; emigration; lecturers; audio; audios; subjectinterest;

Am Baile

Scotland's Global Impact

As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad. <br /> <br /> Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Dr Andrew Mackillop answers the question:<br /> <br /> 'What fired your interest in your particular area of expertise?'<br /> <br /> 'As is always the case, I suppose, the, any interest in history really springs from personal family background experience etc., and it came in a kind of a number of different ways. I, my grandfather was in the army and fought during the Great War and I suppose I got interested in military history as a result of my grandfather's experience - I'd seen photographs of him; his old army kilt, etc. It was a very personal family that drew me to towards military history, but not military history in terms of battles fought in, but rather more about how the Highlands' society was shaped by its relationship to the British army through mass involvement of manpower etc., and so I ended up doing research on the impact of the British army's mass use of Highland manpower and how that affected communities. And that led me, in one sense, into my, what was my early work on the military recruiting economy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.<br /> <br /> But rather less impressive, or professional, I had my first pint in a bar in Harris called the Rodel Hotel and when I had my first legal pint in that bar I remember hearing that the hotel had been built originally by a man called Alexander Macleod of Harris who'd come from, had made his money in India, in the middle of the eighteenth century, and had come back to Harris, and had built this large country house as then, and that became the Rodel Hotel and the pub that I was drinking in. And I thought how on earth did somebody from Harris end up in India, on the other side of the world, and end up coming back? And so my per-, my current area of research and interest is on Scots in India and China and I got to that by drinking in the Rodel Hotel. So it's not exactly-, I should probably emphasise the personal dimension of my grandfather, not my, not my drinking in the pub, But it's, I suppose that, in some sense, gives you that even university lecturers tend to be drawn to history through very personal experiences.'<br /> <br /> <br /> BIOGRAPHY<br /> <br /> Dr Andrew Mackillop is a lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Aberdeen. Publications on Highland history include: 'More Fruitful than the Soil': Army, Empire and the Scottish Highlands, 1715-1815 (East Linton, 2000) and 'The Political Culture of the Scottish Highlands from Culloden to Waterloo', The Historical Journal, 46 (2003). His research interests currently centre upon the differing experiences of the Scots, Irish and Welsh in the Asian hemisphere of British imperialism during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. <br /> <br /> His most recent publication, 'A Union for Empire? Scotland, the English East India Company and the British Union', Scottish Historical Review, 87 (2008) will be followed at the end of this year by, "A Reticent People?': The Welsh in Asia, 1700-1815', in Huw Bowen (ed.), Wales and the British Empire (Manchester, 2009) and, as co-editor with Micheál O' Siochrú, Forging the State: European State Formation and the Anglo-Scottish Union of 1707 (Dundee, 2009).