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TITLE
What are the similarities/differences between the emigrant experience today/early 19th century? - Philomena de Lima
EXTERNAL ID
AB_SGI_10_PHILOMENA_DE_LIMA_Q_05
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Philomena de Lima
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
41062
KEYWORDS
conferences
emigration
lecturers
audio
audios
emigrantexperience

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As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad.

Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Dr Philomena de Lima answers the question:

'Could you list some of the similarities and differences between the emigrant experience today and, say, the early nineteenth century?'

'It's interesting, I can see similarities, because, you know, when Jim Hunter particularly, you know, talks about the way emigrants from Scotland, particularly Scottish people, were viewed and treated by, say, I don't know, maybe the English or whoever were being the masters at that particular time in Australian places, you hear the same things being mentioned about how, you know, economic migrants, and how dirty they all were. And it's interesting how we have the same discourses about people migrating now and 'economic migrants' are a dirty word, you know, in some ways? It seems to be a crime to be an economic migrant. But, you know, in those - in that sort of sense, I think - I mean, I'm not an historian, but I know, I've heard Jim speak on various occasions, and it seems like there are remarkable similarities in the way, you know, in that sense, things, the discourses, you know, that people use haven't changed.

I mean, I think one of the big differences, and I'm just thinking about my own experiences as a child, of having - you know, my father, because he worked for the British Civil Service got six months every two years, or something, holidays, which was amazing, but that was because you had to go by ship; you had to go by liner from Mombassa to India, to Goa. You know, now it would take a good month or something to go. And, so, I did a couple of trips like that, when I was a child, you know, going? So, you know the communication systems? And also the fact that when I was a child and I was at school, the only way I could communicate with my family was by letter, and that would have been from the age of seven, and I was having to write a letter, and then a letter would come back. And, you know, that would take a good two months or so, whereas, you know, you think about the way in which, I mean, my own children are, you know, dotting about the whole world, and, you know, you can communicate every day.

And the whole thing about people keeping in touch by skype, by email, and so on. You know, I mean, you know, from my own experience, I see that as such a vast difference. And I don't know, I sometimes, I find the whole thing about communicating every day as a bit of a noise, really, because I'm not used to it, you know, because I was just used to writing letters. I mean, I use email at work and things, but, you know, but I find that an amazing thing.'


BIOGRAPHY

Dr Philomena de Lima is the Director of the UHI Centre for Remote and Rural Studies based in Inverness. She has lived in the Highlands for around 25 years. She has been actively involved in researching rural policy issues, particularly with regard to migration, social exclusion, minorities and equalities and has published widely on these topics. Recent publications include, with Wright (2009) 'Welcoming Migrants? Migrant labour in rural Scotland in Social Policy and Society', issue 8:3; 'Ticking the Ethnic Box: the experiences of minority ethnic young people in rural communities' in Education in the North, New Series , Number 15 Session 2007-2008, University of Aberdeen; with Jentsch and MacDonald, 'Migrant Workers in Rural Scotland: Going to the Middle of Nowhere' in International Journal on Multicultural Societies (IJMS), Vol. 9, No. 1, 2007; and with Williams, 'Devolution, Multicultural Citizenship and Race Equality: from Laissez Faire to Nationally Responsible Policies' in Critical Social Policy, Vol. 26 (3) 2006.

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What are the similarities/differences between the emigrant experience today/early 19th century? - Philomena de Lima

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

conferences; emigration; lecturers; audio; audios; emigrantexperience;

Am Baile

Scotland's Global Impact

As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad. <br /> <br /> Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Dr Philomena de Lima answers the question:<br /> <br /> 'Could you list some of the similarities and differences between the emigrant experience today and, say, the early nineteenth century?' <br /> <br /> 'It's interesting, I can see similarities, because, you know, when Jim Hunter particularly, you know, talks about the way emigrants from Scotland, particularly Scottish people, were viewed and treated by, say, I don't know, maybe the English or whoever were being the masters at that particular time in Australian places, you hear the same things being mentioned about how, you know, economic migrants, and how dirty they all were. And it's interesting how we have the same discourses about people migrating now and 'economic migrants' are a dirty word, you know, in some ways? It seems to be a crime to be an economic migrant. But, you know, in those - in that sort of sense, I think - I mean, I'm not an historian, but I know, I've heard Jim speak on various occasions, and it seems like there are remarkable similarities in the way, you know, in that sense, things, the discourses, you know, that people use haven't changed. <br /> <br /> I mean, I think one of the big differences, and I'm just thinking about my own experiences as a child, of having - you know, my father, because he worked for the British Civil Service got six months every two years, or something, holidays, which was amazing, but that was because you had to go by ship; you had to go by liner from Mombassa to India, to Goa. You know, now it would take a good month or something to go. And, so, I did a couple of trips like that, when I was a child, you know, going? So, you know the communication systems? And also the fact that when I was a child and I was at school, the only way I could communicate with my family was by letter, and that would have been from the age of seven, and I was having to write a letter, and then a letter would come back. And, you know, that would take a good two months or so, whereas, you know, you think about the way in which, I mean, my own children are, you know, dotting about the whole world, and, you know, you can communicate every day. <br /> <br /> And the whole thing about people keeping in touch by skype, by email, and so on. You know, I mean, you know, from my own experience, I see that as such a vast difference. And I don't know, I sometimes, I find the whole thing about communicating every day as a bit of a noise, really, because I'm not used to it, you know, because I was just used to writing letters. I mean, I use email at work and things, but, you know, but I find that an amazing thing.'<br /> <br /> <br /> BIOGRAPHY<br /> <br /> Dr Philomena de Lima is the Director of the UHI Centre for Remote and Rural Studies based in Inverness. She has lived in the Highlands for around 25 years. She has been actively involved in researching rural policy issues, particularly with regard to migration, social exclusion, minorities and equalities and has published widely on these topics. Recent publications include, with Wright (2009) 'Welcoming Migrants? Migrant labour in rural Scotland in Social Policy and Society', issue 8:3; 'Ticking the Ethnic Box: the experiences of minority ethnic young people in rural communities' in Education in the North, New Series , Number 15 Session 2007-2008, University of Aberdeen; with Jentsch and MacDonald, 'Migrant Workers in Rural Scotland: Going to the Middle of Nowhere' in International Journal on Multicultural Societies (IJMS), Vol. 9, No. 1, 2007; and with Williams, 'Devolution, Multicultural Citizenship and Race Equality: from Laissez Faire to Nationally Responsible Policies' in Critical Social Policy, Vol. 26 (3) 2006.