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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (3 of 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_01_03
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Alasdair Cameron
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41068
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming
villages
dwellings
houses
farms
agriculture
built environment
settlements

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In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about various areas in the Rosehaugh Estate, including Killen and Easter Suddie.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

AC: I'm looking at a catalogue that was prepared for the sale of the estate of Rosehaugh in 1943 when there was an attempt to sell it by auction in, in Edinburgh. The company that were marketing it was Jackson Stops and staff who are still very much on the go as estate agents today. I've been very interested in the estate of Rosehaugh; I happen to live on the edge of it. It was later known as Kilcoy and Rosehaugh that described the area that was covered by it. This catalogue was given to me by someone who knew I was interested in it, found it in their house; they had been from a farming background. He thinks that his father-in-law might have had it at the time the sale was known about in the area. It was priced at two shillings in 1943 and I find it a fascinating document.

CM: That's the, that's catalogue now, not the estate [laughs]

AC: 1943 was not the best time to try and sell land, probably one of the worst times, but it may have been that creditors were pushing things along and that the attempt had to be made. It didn't sell at that particular time but the catalogue remains a valuable document. What obviously was done was that, we think that the agents commissioned Valentines of Dundee, who were famous for producing postcards, to go round all the farms and locations on the estate and produce photographic postcards that have been glued into the spaces in the, the catalogue.

It starts with a general description of the estate and a view of the rocky shores at Rosemarkie I think. All the conditions are mentioned, all the legal stuff, and the income, rental potential, etcetera and lists of the taxation and outgoings, so that if you're a serious investor you can work out whether you could spend your money there or not.

CM: And then the, the estate is divided into lots, em, which you're going to take us through ...

AC: Yes

CM: ... your research since the catalogue.

AC: The sort of things that crops up; there's a few general scenes and one of the early ones in Lot 1 shows a scene that the area known as Killen, and this is actually from the Bog of Shannon looking across the valley at Killen, where you've got sheaves set up and stooks. It's obviously harvest time when this was taken and that's the, the opening shot. Unfortunately, not every farm is photographed - don't quite know why - but one of the most important ones, and still a wonderful set of buildings today, is Easter Suddie and it lists all the details about the farm. Some are fairly standard but some are fascinating. There's an inside shot of the granary which shows grain in sacks, bulk grain on the floor, empty sacks, a sack barrow, scoops for scooping up the grain and putting it into sacks. Now, one of the things I've been doing, probably about twenty years ago, that I've tried to go round all the farms at similar time of year, and photograph them from the same locations. And comparing what was then, and what there is today. In some cases not a lot has changed but in other cases the change is dramatic and it's very difficult to see any of the original features of the farm buildings at all.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (3 of 32)

ROSS

2010s

audios; farmers; farming; villages; dwellings; houses; farms; agriculture; built environment; settlements;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about various areas in the Rosehaugh Estate, including Killen and Easter Suddie.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: I'm looking at a catalogue that was prepared for the sale of the estate of Rosehaugh in 1943 when there was an attempt to sell it by auction in, in Edinburgh. The company that were marketing it was Jackson Stops and staff who are still very much on the go as estate agents today. I've been very interested in the estate of Rosehaugh; I happen to live on the edge of it. It was later known as Kilcoy and Rosehaugh that described the area that was covered by it. This catalogue was given to me by someone who knew I was interested in it, found it in their house; they had been from a farming background. He thinks that his father-in-law might have had it at the time the sale was known about in the area. It was priced at two shillings in 1943 and I find it a fascinating document.<br /> <br /> CM: That's the, that's catalogue now, not the estate [laughs]<br /> <br /> AC: 1943 was not the best time to try and sell land, probably one of the worst times, but it may have been that creditors were pushing things along and that the attempt had to be made. It didn't sell at that particular time but the catalogue remains a valuable document. What obviously was done was that, we think that the agents commissioned Valentines of Dundee, who were famous for producing postcards, to go round all the farms and locations on the estate and produce photographic postcards that have been glued into the spaces in the, the catalogue. <br /> <br /> It starts with a general description of the estate and a view of the rocky shores at Rosemarkie I think. All the conditions are mentioned, all the legal stuff, and the income, rental potential, etcetera and lists of the taxation and outgoings, so that if you're a serious investor you can work out whether you could spend your money there or not.<br /> <br /> CM: And then the, the estate is divided into lots, em, which you're going to take us through ...<br /> <br /> AC: Yes<br /> <br /> CM: ... your research since the catalogue.<br /> <br /> AC: The sort of things that crops up; there's a few general scenes and one of the early ones in Lot 1 shows a scene that the area known as Killen, and this is actually from the Bog of Shannon looking across the valley at Killen, where you've got sheaves set up and stooks. It's obviously harvest time when this was taken and that's the, the opening shot. Unfortunately, not every farm is photographed - don't quite know why - but one of the most important ones, and still a wonderful set of buildings today, is Easter Suddie and it lists all the details about the farm. Some are fairly standard but some are fascinating. There's an inside shot of the granary which shows grain in sacks, bulk grain on the floor, empty sacks, a sack barrow, scoops for scooping up the grain and putting it into sacks. Now, one of the things I've been doing, probably about twenty years ago, that I've tried to go round all the farms at similar time of year, and photograph them from the same locations. And comparing what was then, and what there is today. In some cases not a lot has changed but in other cases the change is dramatic and it's very difficult to see any of the original features of the farm buildings at all.