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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (9 of 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_01_09
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Alasdair Cameron
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41074
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming
villages
dwellings
houses
farms
agriculture
built environment
settlements

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In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about various areas in the Rosehaugh Estate including Feddenhill, Jeanfield and Mount Pleasant.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

AC: We also get a nice view of Fortrose from the hill behind which gives an idea of the amount of development that's happened around Fortrose since these days.

CM: So this, this isn't the Feddenhill is it? No?

AC: Yes, yes that's probably just up here.

CM: It's very interesting. You're right, there's - if one thinks of all the houses there today, I mean, we're looking at ...

AC: Yes, whole site, the whole hillside is covered in houses.

CM: And we're looking at bare ground, really?

AC: Yes, yes.

CM: So yes, a lot of change in the last sixty odd years.

AC: And, of course at this period all these different houses we're looking at, the feus which was basically the, well it was the feudal system and that you were, it was difficult to buy a house site but the landlords would feu you a site and you paid, basically a rent for that land for ever more. There was a feature a number of years ago where you could redeem your feu duties to be able to buy your house site. It was done as a multiple of the feu duty that you were required to pay annually but the list of feu duties here gives an interesting list of all the different people who had feus and what they were doing with them. I think I did spot somewhere there's even a feu for a telephone kiosk but quite a lot of the names featured there, these families are still very much in, in the area.

CM: Yes, we have the Manns and ...

AC: Yes

CM: ... McLemans

AC: That, lots of, lots of names there. So there's even lands for the railway station, the meal mill and you can see who was the tenant on the various places there. 'The Roadman's Cottage at Jeanfield - feu duty of five shillings.'

CM: And is that cottage still there now, Alasdair, or ...?

AC: I think it probably is, yes.

CM: Uh-huh. Just ...

AC: I'm not sure of the exact location but I think it is.

CM: And the roadman being the person who was responsible then for maintaining ...?

AC: It would be, there would be, roadmen given an area to maintain and were probably had their whole kit on a bicycle, which was probably a shovel and a pick, and if they're lucky, a wheelbarrow but by doing basic maintenance on a regular basis, keeping all the side drains clear, it is amazing how they did maintain the roads. A total change from what seems to be the situation today where's there's no maintenance and that it's only when something goes horribly wrong and there has to be a very expensive rectification that could've been eliminated by basic maintenance. Another interesting name, the Drum, I've no idea what language that comes from.

CM: And that's just, that's located just behind the Ormond Hill, or ...?

AC: It's, that's right yes, yes, yes.

CM: Uh-huh.

AC: Another interesting one - Mount Pleasant; it is a nice location, a great view. When I last looked at it, it was dreadfully spoilt by the fact that the Hydro Electric Board had stuck a pole with a big transformer just obscuring the view.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (9 of 32)

ROSS

2010s

audios; farmers; farming; villages; dwellings; houses; farms; agriculture; built environment; settlements;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about various areas in the Rosehaugh Estate including Feddenhill, Jeanfield and Mount Pleasant.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: We also get a nice view of Fortrose from the hill behind which gives an idea of the amount of development that's happened around Fortrose since these days.<br /> <br /> CM: So this, this isn't the Feddenhill is it? No?<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, yes that's probably just up here.<br /> <br /> CM: It's very interesting. You're right, there's - if one thinks of all the houses there today, I mean, we're looking at ...<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, whole site, the whole hillside is covered in houses. <br /> <br /> CM: And we're looking at bare ground, really?<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: So yes, a lot of change in the last sixty odd years.<br /> <br /> AC: And, of course at this period all these different houses we're looking at, the feus which was basically the, well it was the feudal system and that you were, it was difficult to buy a house site but the landlords would feu you a site and you paid, basically a rent for that land for ever more. There was a feature a number of years ago where you could redeem your feu duties to be able to buy your house site. It was done as a multiple of the feu duty that you were required to pay annually but the list of feu duties here gives an interesting list of all the different people who had feus and what they were doing with them. I think I did spot somewhere there's even a feu for a telephone kiosk but quite a lot of the names featured there, these families are still very much in, in the area.<br /> <br /> CM: Yes, we have the Manns and ...<br /> <br /> AC: Yes <br /> <br /> CM: ... McLemans<br /> <br /> AC: That, lots of, lots of names there. So there's even lands for the railway station, the meal mill and you can see who was the tenant on the various places there. 'The Roadman's Cottage at Jeanfield - feu duty of five shillings.'<br /> <br /> CM: And is that cottage still there now, Alasdair, or ...?<br /> <br /> AC: I think it probably is, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: Uh-huh. Just ...<br /> <br /> AC: I'm not sure of the exact location but I think it is.<br /> <br /> CM: And the roadman being the person who was responsible then for maintaining ...?<br /> <br /> AC: It would be, there would be, roadmen given an area to maintain and were probably had their whole kit on a bicycle, which was probably a shovel and a pick, and if they're lucky, a wheelbarrow but by doing basic maintenance on a regular basis, keeping all the side drains clear, it is amazing how they did maintain the roads. A total change from what seems to be the situation today where's there's no maintenance and that it's only when something goes horribly wrong and there has to be a very expensive rectification that could've been eliminated by basic maintenance. Another interesting name, the Drum, I've no idea what language that comes from.<br /> <br /> CM: And that's just, that's located just behind the Ormond Hill, or ...?<br /> <br /> AC: It's, that's right yes, yes, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> AC: Another interesting one - Mount Pleasant; it is a nice location, a great view. When I last looked at it, it was dreadfully spoilt by the fact that the Hydro Electric Board had stuck a pole with a big transformer just obscuring the view.