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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (10 of 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_01_10
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Alasdair Cameron
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41075
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming
villages
dwellings
houses
farms
agriculture
built environment
settlements

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In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about various areas in the Rosehaugh Estate including Newton, Cowsgate and Wester Craiglands.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

AC: An attractive homestead known as Newton, which doesn't help very much because there's so many Newtons everywhere you go. I think it's the second commonest name in the Highland list of placenames.

CM: This would be now, I think it's the property above the railway line just to the east of Avoch, would that be right?

AC: Yes, yes that's correct.

CM: And on the first edition map and, there's an orchard to the south.

AC: Yes.

CM: And then the cows, what's know as the Cowsgate, going down from the orchard to the town, that roadway that's marked on the map.

AC: And I think the family that have roots in that area and the orchard, Junor is the name that springs to mind because I remember a lady that was looking for it because she had family connections there and she was of the Junor family.

CM: Is there still a farm at Newton now?

AC: Yes, I'm not sure if it's amalgamated with something else, I'm not sure if it's on its own or not.

CM: One of the things that is quite significant, I suppose, in the period from the nineteenth century, the late nineteenth century, to the period of the, the estate catalogue, of course, would be how many of the farms, their local geography would have been changed by the putting in of the railway. So paths and track-ways would've had to alter quite a bit, I'm sure.

AC: Yes, yes, yes. I know I was doing a public meeting, consultations on railways, for example in Rogart, and that it was anticipated that it was going to be a protest meeting where there was a threat of the railway closing but everyone in that room was anxious to know how quickly the railway would be closing because all the crofts were split by the railway and they had to travel for miles to get from one side to the other, so it upset the politicians totally. They were ready to argue but they had an open door waiting for it to be closed, and it didn't close. We've got the farm of Wester Craiglands. There's various Easter and Wester Craiglands and that again, if you look carefully, you can see the stacks in the stack yard and that somebody did suggest that they could see washing on the line so it must've been Monday.

CM: And this, this Wester Craiglands is, em, it says that it's beyond Craiglands Wood so presumably to the west of that woodland?

AC: Yes, there is a road that goes from Fortrose up by Mount Pleasant. It veers into Craiglands; it goes on to, right, right through to Ordhill and right through to Raddery, so there's probably four or five farms on that road. Don't think it's a public road all the way; it's only tarred so far.

CM: Something I'm seeing written in the prose beneath the picture of the farm is that the cottages, in the suite of rooms and spaces in each of the cottages, there's a closet. Now, what are they referring to there?

AC: Right, well a closet is still, very, an American term which is not the same usage in this country, that the closet I think they're referring to there is basically the luxury of an inside toilet, which may not be water flushing but might be a sophisticated bucket with a lid, I suspect.

CM: But quite interesting that a space is given to that because I suppose, for many folk when they're thinking of this period, well the 'cludgie' or the outdoor facilities would be much more common I'm sure, or maybe this is a period where that's changing and where ...

AC: The other feature on the farmhouse is it's got a Maid's Room so there's an implication lurking there, but it has a WC so that it's sort of one of the slightly upmarket ones there.

CM: I think you, that might be interesting that you've pointed out perhaps the difference between what's called a water closet and then maybe the more rudimentary closet in the cottages.

AC: Yes, yes, yes, yes. Mmm. Mmm-hmm.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (10 of 32)

ROSS

2010s

audios; farmers; farming; villages; dwellings; houses; farms; agriculture; built environment; settlements;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about various areas in the Rosehaugh Estate including Newton, Cowsgate and Wester Craiglands.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: An attractive homestead known as Newton, which doesn't help very much because there's so many Newtons everywhere you go. I think it's the second commonest name in the Highland list of placenames.<br /> <br /> CM: This would be now, I think it's the property above the railway line just to the east of Avoch, would that be right?<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, yes that's correct.<br /> <br /> CM: And on the first edition map and, there's an orchard to the south.<br /> <br /> AC: Yes.<br /> <br /> CM: And then the cows, what's know as the Cowsgate, going down from the orchard to the town, that roadway that's marked on the map.<br /> <br /> AC: And I think the family that have roots in that area and the orchard, Junor is the name that springs to mind because I remember a lady that was looking for it because she had family connections there and she was of the Junor family.<br /> <br /> CM: Is there still a farm at Newton now?<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, I'm not sure if it's amalgamated with something else, I'm not sure if it's on its own or not.<br /> <br /> CM: One of the things that is quite significant, I suppose, in the period from the nineteenth century, the late nineteenth century, to the period of the, the estate catalogue, of course, would be how many of the farms, their local geography would have been changed by the putting in of the railway. So paths and track-ways would've had to alter quite a bit, I'm sure.<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, yes, yes. I know I was doing a public meeting, consultations on railways, for example in Rogart, and that it was anticipated that it was going to be a protest meeting where there was a threat of the railway closing but everyone in that room was anxious to know how quickly the railway would be closing because all the crofts were split by the railway and they had to travel for miles to get from one side to the other, so it upset the politicians totally. They were ready to argue but they had an open door waiting for it to be closed, and it didn't close. We've got the farm of Wester Craiglands. There's various Easter and Wester Craiglands and that again, if you look carefully, you can see the stacks in the stack yard and that somebody did suggest that they could see washing on the line so it must've been Monday.<br /> <br /> CM: And this, this Wester Craiglands is, em, it says that it's beyond Craiglands Wood so presumably to the west of that woodland?<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, there is a road that goes from Fortrose up by Mount Pleasant. It veers into Craiglands; it goes on to, right, right through to Ordhill and right through to Raddery, so there's probably four or five farms on that road. Don't think it's a public road all the way; it's only tarred so far.<br /> <br /> CM: Something I'm seeing written in the prose beneath the picture of the farm is that the cottages, in the suite of rooms and spaces in each of the cottages, there's a closet. Now, what are they referring to there?<br /> <br /> AC: Right, well a closet is still, very, an American term which is not the same usage in this country, that the closet I think they're referring to there is basically the luxury of an inside toilet, which may not be water flushing but might be a sophisticated bucket with a lid, I suspect.<br /> <br /> CM: But quite interesting that a space is given to that because I suppose, for many folk when they're thinking of this period, well the 'cludgie' or the outdoor facilities would be much more common I'm sure, or maybe this is a period where that's changing and where ...<br /> <br /> AC: The other feature on the farmhouse is it's got a Maid's Room so there's an implication lurking there, but it has a WC so that it's sort of one of the slightly upmarket ones there.<br /> <br /> CM: I think you, that might be interesting that you've pointed out perhaps the difference between what's called a water closet and then maybe the more rudimentary closet in the cottages.<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, yes, yes, yes. Mmm. Mmm-hmm.